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Latest Census of Marine Life Stories

2011-06-23 23:06:24

Ian Jonsen, a research associate and adjunct professor in the Department of Biology at Dalhousie University and co-lead investigator of the Future of Marine Animal Populations Project (FMAP), has teamed up with Barbara Block at Stanford University and several other American researchers to conclude a two year study entitled, "Tracking apex marine predator movements in a dynamic ocean" published in the science journal Nature released June 22. The study summarized the results from a ten year...

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2011-02-22 11:33:50

In the latest issue of 'Current Biology', researchers from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) have published an analysis of growth rates of a tiny sea animal. Samples of the bryozoan, (Cellarinella nutti) a sea-bed filter-feeding animal that looks like branching twigs, collected during Captain Scott's Antarctic trips, are yielding data that may prove valuable in projecting climate change, BBC News is reporting. The samples were collected in the Ross Sea, where Capt. Robert Falcon Scott...

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2011-02-09 10:29:42

Analysis of a comprehensive database has revealed strong links between biological productivity in the surface oceans and patterns of biomass and abundance at the seafloor, helping to explain large regional differences. The research was conducted by an international, multi-institutional research team including scientists from the National Oceanography Centre (NOC), and incorporated data from the Census of Marine Life (CoML). The vast majority of the biological production in the world's oceans...

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2011-02-08 13:34:54

By Louis Bergeron, Stanford Tagging and tracking leatherback sea turtles has produced new insights into the turtles' behavior in a part of the South Pacific Ocean long considered an oceanic desert. The new data will help researchers predict the turtles' movements in the ever-changing environment of the open ocean, with the goal of reducing the impact of fishing on the endangered leatherback population. Leatherbacks.  They are the Olympians of the turtle world "“ swimming farther,...

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2010-11-01 06:25:00

'It is past time to get serious about measuring what's happening to the seas around us' The ocean surface is 30 percent more acidic today than it was in 1800, much of that increase occurring in the last 50 years - a rising trend that could both harm coral reefs and profoundly impact tiny shelled plankton at the base of the ocean food web, scientists warn. Despite the seriousness of such changes to the ocean, however, the world has yet to deploy a complete suite of available tools to monitor...

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2010-10-04 09:30:00

There are more than one million different types of creatures living in the world's oceans today, according to a newly-released, decade-long effort to record marine life species around the world. The Census of Marine Life, which was an international effort began that in the year 2000 and was officially completed on Monday, featured more than 2,700 experts, from over 80 different countries and territories, representing 670 different institutions. "We prevailed over early doubts that a Census...

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2010-09-20 11:22:58

Special issue of Marine Ecology publishes seamount research to contribute to the Census of Marine Life They challenge the mountain ranges of the Alps, the Andes and the Himalayas in size yet surprisingly little is known about seamounts, the vast mountains hidden under the world's oceans. Now in a special issue of Marine Ecology scientists uncover the mystery of life on these submerged mountain ranges and reveal why these under studied ecosystems are under threat. The bathymetry of our oceans...

2010-09-01 14:23:51

Scientists are gaining a deeper understanding of marine mammal travel patterns using a large-scale tracking network. A new PLoS collection, created in conjunction with the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) Program and the Census of Marine Life (CoML), will highlight the variety of ways scientists are using this large POST network to trace marine animal movement in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. The PLoS POST Collection launches on August 31st. POST provides a tool for researchers from...

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2010-08-03 10:46:49

New research from the University of Sheffield has discovered that the deep open ocean, by far the largest habitat for life on Earth, is currently the most under-explored area of the sea, and the one we know least about. The research, which was published August 1, 2010 in the journal PLoS ONE, has mapped the distribution of marine species records and found that most of our knowledge of marine biodiversity comes from the shallow waters or the ocean floor, rather than the deep pelagic ocean- the...

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2010-08-03 09:30:00

The waters surrounding Australia and Japan are home to the greatest variety of aquatic lifeforms, and crustaceans such as crabs, lobsters, crayfish and shrimp are the most common species in the world's seas, according to the findings of the Census of Marine Life. The information, which was disclosed in a series of articles published Monday in the open access journal PLoS ONE, comes from a decade-long effort by more than 360 scientists to catalog species in 25 different regions, ranging from...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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