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Latest Census of Marine Life Stories

2008-07-08 15:00:26

Dr. Patrick N. Halpin, a leading expert in marine conservation, will discuss "Protecting the Large Pelagics: New Technologies for Marine Conservation in the Open Ocean" at World Wildlife Fund on Thursday, July 10, 2008 at 4:30 p.m. The lecture is part of the Kathryn Fuller Science for Nature Seminar series, which brings distinguished scientists from a variety of fields to Washington, D.C. to present cutting edge research of central importance to international conservation. Ship strikes,...

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2008-06-25 13:05:00

World Register of Marine Species inaugurated with first 122,500 validated names; over 56,000 aliases for ocean species identified Census of Marine Life-affiliated scientists consolidating world databases of ocean organisms have demoted to alias status almost one-third of all names culled from 34 regional and highly specialized inventories. The new World Register of Marine Species contains about 122,500 validated marine species names (experts having recognized and tidied up some 56,400 aliases...

2008-06-19 15:00:18

By MARGARET WERTHEIM Brainless, immobile and with only the most primitive nervous systems, coral polyps have built some of the most magnificent structures on our planet. SILENTLY and steadily, a tragedy is unfolding beneath the ocean's waves: Coral reefs around the world are disappearing. According to some projections, there could be few, if any, left by the end of the century. This dire and credible prediction has shocked many marine scientists, who had not realized how close to the...

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2008-03-07 00:10:00

It's hard to study a creature when you only catch fleeting glimpses of it. Up until recently, that was one of the big stumbling blocks for marine biologists and ecologists, but advances in electronic tracking technology have allowed them to peer farther across, and deeper under, the surface of the oceans than ever before. Satellite tracking systems and acoustic sensors are giving researchers insights into the behavior and lifestyles of some very elusive animals in the ocean, including the...

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2008-02-18 09:45:00

It's hard to study a creature when you only catch fleeting glimpses of it. Up until recently, that was one of the big stumbling blocks for marine biologists and ecologists, but advances in electronic tracking technology have allowed them to peer farther across, and deeper under, the surface of the oceans than ever before. Satellite tracking systems and acoustic sensors are giving researchers insights into the behavior and lifestyles of some very elusive animals in the ocean, including the...

2006-08-20 20:05:00

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - South American "Red Devil" squid found off Alaska and jellyfish plaguing the Mediterranean may point to vast disruptions in the seas linked to global warming, pollution or over-fishing, experts say. Fish such as salmon and mackerel have also been spotted in the Arctic, far north of their normal ranges, in a possible vanguard of wrenching billion-dollar shifts in world fish stocks this century caused by warming oceans. "There will be...

2006-07-31 23:45:00

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - The oceans are teeming with 10 to 100 more types of bacteria than previously believed, many of them unknown, according to a study released on Monday that has jolted scientists' understanding of evolution in the seas. Using a new genetic mapping technique, U.S., Dutch and Spanish scientists said they found more than 20,000 different types of microbe in a single liter (1.8 pint) of water from deep sites in the Pacific and Atlantic...

2006-07-31 16:00:00

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - The oceans are teeming with 10 to 100 more types of bacteria than previously believed, many of them unknown, according to a study released on Monday that has jolted scientists' understanding of evolution in the seas. Using a new genetic mapping technique, U.S., Dutch and Spanish scientists said they found more than 20,000 different types of microbe in a single liter (1.8 pint) of water from deep sites in the Pacific and Atlantic...

2006-07-31 16:00:00

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO -- The oceans are teeming with 10 to 100 more types of bacteria than previously believed, many of them unknown, according to a study released on Monday that has jolted scientists' understanding of evolution in the seas. Using a new genetic mapping technique, U.S., Dutch and Spanish scientists said they found more than 20,000 different types of microbe in a single liter (1.8 pint) of water from deep sites in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans....

2006-03-14 20:06:12

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - With tracts of the ocean as little known as Mars, discoveries of a stunning richness of life in the depths are spurring calls for more protection from trawlers, oil drillers and prospectors. Only about 0.5 percent of the oceans are in protected areas, compared to about 12 percent of the earth's land surface set aside in parks for creatures ranging from lions in South Africa to polar bears in Alaska. A United Nations...