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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:14 EDT

Latest Centenarian Stories

2006-08-10 07:29:11

BOSTON (Reuters) - Faith and spirituality were cited most often by people over the age of 100 as the source of their longevity, according to a survey sponsored by a unit of UnitedHealth Group. In a survey of 100 people between the ages of 100 and 104, 23 percent said faith rather than genes and good medical care were responsible for their long life. Other factors given included hard work, a healthy diet and "living a good, clean life." Sixty-one percent of those surveyed said there...

2006-08-10 00:10:12

BOSTON (Reuters) - Faith and spirituality were cited most often by people over the age of 100 as the source of their longevity, according to a survey sponsored by a unit of UnitedHealth Group. In a survey of 100 people between the ages of 100 and 104, 23 percent said faith rather than genes and good medical care were responsible for their long life. Other factors given included hard work, a healthy diet and "living a good, clean life." Sixty-one percent of those surveyed said there...

2006-06-23 16:39:15

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People are more likely to see their 100th birthday, research hints, if they were born to young mothers. The age at which a mother gives birth has a major impact on how long her child will live, two researchers from the University of Chicago's Center on Aging told the Chicago Actuarial Association meeting this spring. The chances of living to the ripe old age of 100 -- and beyond -- nearly double for a child born to a woman before her 25th birthday, Drs....

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2006-04-18 12:45:00

Children of women under 25 twice as likely to live to 100, study finds Society's oldest members are most likely to be born to its youngest mothers, new research suggests. The odds of living to 100 and beyond double when a person is born to a woman under 25 years of age, compared to those people born to older mothers, according to one of the most rigorous studies on the subject yet conducted. The finding may also help clear up a statistical mystery -- three years ago, the same husband-and-wife...

2005-09-13 03:13:23

TOKYO (Reuters) - More than 25,000 Japanese will be aged over 100 by the end of the month, compared with just 153 four decades ago, the government said on Tuesday, in a striking illustration of the speed at which the country is aging. The statistics, released by the Health Ministry ahead of the Respect for the Aged national holiday on Monday, throw a spotlight on the pressure Japan faces to fund pensions and health care, with a shrinking work force supporting the growing number of...