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Latest Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability Stories

Determining How Nature's Benefits Link To Human Well-being
2013-05-23 12:16:52

Michigan State University What people take from nature — water, food, timber, inspiration, relaxation — are so abundant, it seems self-evident. Until you try to quantitatively understand how and to what extent they contribute to humans. In today's world, where competition for and degradation of natural resources increases globally, it becomes ever more crucial to quantify the value of ecosystem services — the precise term that defines nature's benefits, and even more...

Researchers Give Long Look At Who Benefits From Nature Tourism
2012-04-26 06:31:42

Using nature's beauty as a tourist draw can boost conservation in China's valued panda preserves, but it isn't an automatic ticket out of poverty for the human habitants, a unique long-term study shows. The policy hitch: Often those who benefit most from nature-based tourism endeavors are people who already have resources. The truly impoverished have a harder time breaking into the tourism business. Wei Liu's study, published in the April 25 edition of PLoS One, looks at nearly a decade...

2011-07-28 01:13:14

Besides helping each other plant and harvest, rural Chinese neighbors also influence each other's environmental behavior "“ farmers are more likely to reenroll their land in a conservation program if they talk to their neighbors about it. Scientists from the Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability at Michigan State University used a simulation model to study the amount of land farmers in the Wolong Nature Reserve in southwestern China reenrolled in the Grain-to-Green Program...

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2011-05-11 08:32:45

Since the 1950s, sustainability in northern hardwood forests was achieved by chopping down trees in small clumps to naturally make room for new ones to spring up. Early experiments with single-tree and group selection logging found that desirable species like sugar maples did a great job of regenerating in the sunny, rain-drenched harvest gaps "“ theoretically eliminating the need to replant. But something has changed. In a sweeping study of a huge swath of Michigan's Upper Peninsula,...

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2011-01-18 10:10:00

Study of Chinese citizens says jobs more important than salary when it comes to pro-environmental behavior People with good jobs found in large cities are more likely to engage in pro-environmental activities. So says a new study of China's environmental behavior published this week in the British journal Environmental Conservation. For the first time, scientists weighed employment and leadership when considering how people act regarding their natural surroundings. They found the status and...