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Centipedes Reference Libraries

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Giant Redheaded Centipede Scolopendra heros
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Scolopendra heros, also referred to as the Giant Redheaded Centipede, calls parts of the southern central and southwestern United States, as well as a significant portion of Mexico, its home. It has not been found west of the Colorado River. Varying in length from 6.5 to 8 inches, its trunk has 21 to 23 pairs of legs. The body is aposematically colored. This is a defensive coloration...

Allothereua maculata
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Allothereua maculata, found in Australia, is also known by its common name, the house centipede. This common name is also attributed to other species elsewhere. A. maculata has a body that is approximately 0.8 – 1.0 inches in length and is comprised of 15 segments and 15 pairs of long legs. One pair of antennae are located on its head. There is also a single long pair of caudal...

Common Desert Centipede Scolopendra polymorpha
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Common Desert Centipede (Scolopendra polymorpha), also known as the Tiger Centipede, Banded Desert Centipede, or Sonoran Desert Centipede, is a species of centipede indigenous to the Southwestern United States and Northern Mexico, and up to the Pacific Coast. Its habitat includes dry grasslands, forest and desert, where it will usually take up residence under rocks or burrow into rotten...

Chinese Red-headed Centipede Scolopendra subspinipes
2014-01-12 00:00:00

The Chinese Red-headed Centipede (Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans), also known as the Chinese Red Head, is a species of centipede found in East Asia and Australia. This creature is found typically in damp, moist environments, where it grows to an average length of 8 inches. In ancient Chinese traditions, this species is used for its healing properties. Placing a Chinese red head on a rash...

Word of the Day
dingle
  • A small wooded valley; a dell.
  • The protecting weather-shed built around the entrance to a house.
  • The roofed-over space between the kitchen and the sleeping-quarters in a logging-camp, commonly used as a storeroom.
The word 'dingle' comes from Middle English dell, hollow.
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