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Latest Centromere Stories

2009-10-26 23:48:38

Biological species are often defined on the basis of reproductive isolation. Ever since Darwin pointed out his difficulty in explaining why crosses between two species often yield sterile or inviable progeny (for instance, mules emerging from a cross between a horse and a donkey), biologists have struggled with this question. New research into this field by basic scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, published online Oct. 22 in Science Express, suggests that the solution to...

2009-09-28 12:17:39

The Stowers Institute's Gerton Lab has provided new evidence to clarify the structure of nucleosomes containing Cse4, a centromere-specific histone protein required for proper kinetochore function, which plays a critical role in the process of mitosis. The work, conducted in yeast cells, was published in the most recent issue of Molecular Cell. The centromeric nucleosome acts as a guide for the position of the kinetochore. The kinetochore attaches the chromosome to a microtubule for...

2009-09-03 15:25:35

The unique mechanism behind the evolutionary survival of the human Y chromosome may also be responsible for a range of sex disorders, from failed sperm production to sex reversal to Turner Syndrome. Roughly six years ago, David Page's lab at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research reported the discovery of eight large areas of mirror-imaged genetic sequences, or palindromes, along the Y chromosome. Because the Y chromosome essentially has no partner with which to swap genes, a process...

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2009-07-01 10:25:00

Lars Jansen's work on the formation of the centromere, a key cellular structure in powering and controlling chromosome segregation and accurate cell division, has just earned him a paper in Nature Cell Biology and a prestigious EMBO installation grant, of 50,000 euro per year, for a maximum of five years.Lars Jansen moved from California to the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC), in Portugal, last year to head the Epigenetic Mechanisms group. The Nature Cell Biology...

2009-04-10 08:39:04

Chp1, a histone-binding protein, helps recruit molecular machinery that establishes heterochromatin 'silencing' domainsThe DNA in the 23 pairs of chromosomes in each of the billions of cells of the human body is so tightly packed that it would measure six feet in length if stretched end to end. A genome of this size can squeeze into a cell's tiny nucleus because it is compressed into highly condensed chromatin fibers by proteins called histones.All chromatin in the cell nucleus represents a...

2008-12-23 15:05:00

- GlaxoSmithKline continues to lead development activities for GSK-923295 LONDON, Dec. 23 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and Cytokinetics, Incorporated (Nasdaq: CYTK) announced today that GSK has informed Cytokinetics that it will not exercise its option to license ispinesib or SB-743921 as provided under the Collaboration and License Agreement entered into by the companies in 2001. All rights to ispinesib and SB-743921, each novel inhibitors of kinesin spindle protein...

2008-10-23 09:00:10

Cytokinetics, Incorporated (NASDAQ: CYTK) announced today that three posters containing data on GSK-923295, an inhibitor of centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E), and one poster containing data on SB-743921, an inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), were presented at the 20th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics held at the Geneva Palexpo, Geneva, Switzerland. Three posters presented today contain preclinical or clinical data relating to GSK-923295,...

2005-07-21 18:24:35

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Breakages in chromosomes in mammalian evolution have occurred at preferred rather than random sites as long thought, and many of the sites are involved in human cancers, an international team of 25 scientists has discovered. The researchers, reporting in the July 22 issue of the journal Science, also found that chromosomal evolution has accelerated, based on the rate of breakages and reorganization, since the extinction of dinosaurs 65 million years ago. In a study led by...

2005-07-14 16:40:00

Dr. Craig Peterson and colleagues have identified an S. pombe ubiquitin ligase that is required for heterochromatin formation and gene silencing. The authors purified the heterochromatin assembly protein, Rik1, along with two novel Rik-1 associated proteins that proved essential for H3-K9 methylation and centromere silencing. Intruigingly, they also found a novel Rik1-associated E3 ligase that is necessary for heterochromatin assembly. "These data identify a cullin-dependent E3 ligase as a...

2005-06-17 10:00:00

Fri., June 17, 2005 "“ Researchers report today that regions of the human genome have been hotspots for acquiring duplicated DNA sequences "“ but only at specific time-points during evolution. It appears that long periods of genomic stasis, at least with regard to the accretion of duplicated DNA fragments, are "punctuated" by relatively brief episodes of duplicative activity. This is the first time that such temporal bias has been documented for DNA duplications, and it challenges...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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