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Octopus-Inspired Camouflage Sheet Developed By US Chinese

Octopus-Inspired Camouflage Sheet Developed By US, Chinese Research Team

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Drawing inspiration from the color-changing capabilities of cephalopod skin, researchers have developed a new camouflage sheet capable of quickly reading its environment and adapting to...

Latest Cephalopod Stories

Predatory Characteristics Of Extinct Sea Scorpion Reexamined
2014-07-11 10:42:07

Gerard LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientist from Yale University studied the extinct pterygotid eurypterid, a giant sea scorpion, the largest arthropod that ever lived. It was always believed to be a fierce predator, but a recent study revealed that may not have been the case. The paper titled, “What big eyes you have: The ecological role of giant pterygotid eurypterids,” is published in the journal Biology Letters. Ross Anderson, a Yale graduate student and...

Cuttlefish Camouflage Nanoscale Photonic Device
2014-01-29 11:58:08

[ Watch the Video: What Mechanisms Are Behind Cuttlefish Camouflage? ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Capable of producing zebra-like camouflage or ‘hypnotic’ color oscillations, the skin of the cuttlefish has long fascinated scientists looking to unlock its secrets. Now, a new study from Harvard University has revealed a natural nanoscale photonic device that allows the so-called 'chameleon of the sea' to dynamically change its colors. "Nature solved the...

Large Humboldt Squid Invading Coastal California In Record Numbers
2013-01-07 14:52:44

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Humboldt squid have overrun the waters off the coast of Southern California, and the area´s fishermen have taken to the sea en masse–catching boatloads of the ultra-fresh calamari. One report noted a fishing boat that had caught more than 200 squid in an hour, leading the captain to return his ship to port early. “I have enough for a whole year,” John Plaziak, one of the fishermen, told the San Diego...

What Do A Kindle And Cuttlefish Have In Common?
2012-09-26 16:20:42

Research out today from a multidisciplinary team headed by the University of Cincinnati examines parallels between e-Paper technology (the technology behind sunlight-readable devices like the Kindle) and biological organisms that change color. Over millions of years, biological organisms — from the chameleon and cuttlefish to the octopus and squid — have developed color-changing abilities for adaptive concealment (e.g., camouflage) and communication signaling (e.g., warning or...

Jurassic Squid Ink Very Similar To Modern Squid Ink
2012-05-22 08:48:43

An international team of scientists have for the first time discovered two 160-million-year-old giant cephalopod fossils with intact ink sacs that contain dried pigment similar to that of modern cuttlefish. The researchers, of which includes a professor from the University of Virginia, said the ancient brownish-black pigment, known as eumelanin, is widespread in the animal kingdom in squid ink, bird feathers and even human hair and skin. And because the fossilized pigment is so similar to...

2012-05-02 11:37:07

Researchers from the University of Bristol have created artificial muscles that can be transformed at the flick of a switch to mimic the remarkable camouflaging abilities of organisms such as squid and zebrafish. They demonstrate two individual transforming mechanisms that they believe could be used in 'smart clothing' to trigger camouflaging tricks similar to those seen in nature. The study is published today, 2 May, in IOP Publishing's journal Bioinspiration and Biomimetics, and is...

First Fruitful, Then Futile: Ammonites Or The Boon And Bane Of Many Offspring
2012-04-23 08:48:13

For 300 million years, they were the ultimate survivors. They successfully negotiated three mass extinctions, only to die out eventually at the end of the Cretaceous along with the dinosaurs: Ammonoids, or ammonites as they are also known, were marine cephalopods believed to be related to today's squid and nautiloids. Ammonoids changed their reproductive strategy early on in the course of evolution. However, what was once a successful initial strategy may well have proved to be a fatal...

Image 1 - Disproportionate Eyes Help Giant Squids Avoid Predators
2012-03-16 04:37:46

Researchers from Swedish and American universities say that they have solved the mystery as to why giant and colossal squid have such enormous eyes, and perhaps unsurprisingly, the oversized ocular orbits are essentially a defense mechanism. According to Rob Waugh of the Daily Mail, the giant squid can be upwards of 27-feet long and can weigh half a ton, or "as much as five adult men." Even so, their eyes, which are roughly the size of a basketball, are still "far, far too big for their...

Instant Camouflage Discovered In Two Cephalopods
2011-11-11 11:17:36

[ Watch the Video ] Scientists have discovered two deep ocean species of cephalopods, the octopus Japetella heathi and the squid Onychoteuthis banksii, that can go from transparent to opaque in the blink of an eye, a new study finds. This impressive camouflage swap, from both an octopus and a squid, is an adaptation that help keeps the species safe from different types of predators, Stephanie Pappas of LiveScience reports. The first predators that the cephalopods must be wary of are...

Researchers Complete Mollusk Evolutionary Tree
2011-10-27 04:47:06

Mollusks have been around for so long (at least 500 million years), are so prevalent on land and in water (from backyard gardens to the deep ocean), and are so valuable to people (clam chowder, oysters on the half shell) that one might assume scientists had learned everything about them. “Here´s this big, diverse group of animals, and we don´t know how they were related to each other,” said Casey Dunn, an evolutionary biologist at Brown University who specializes in...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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