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Ceratops Reference Libraries

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Ngoubou
2013-10-07 08:23:12

The Ngoubou is cryptid in the savanna area of Cameroon and is claimed to fight elephants for land. The pygmies of the region call the creature a Ngoubou that translates to rhinoceros, but the pygmies say that it is not a normal rhinoceros. While a rhino has one horn, the Ngoubou has six horns around its frill. According to locals, the Ngoubou is about the size of an ox. William Gibb and...

Styracosaurus
2013-04-29 14:54:48

Styracosaurus, meaning “spiked lizard” from the Ancient Greek styrax “spike at the butt-end of a spear-shaft” and sauros “lizard” was a genus of herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur from the Cretaceous Period, about 76.5 to 75 million years ago. It had four to six long horns, stretching from its neck frill, a smaller horn on each cheek, and a single horn jutting out from its nose, which...

Triceratops
2013-04-28 14:27:16

Triceratops is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that lived during the late Maastrichtian stage of the Late Cretaceous Period, approximately 68 to 65.5 million years ago in what is currently North America. It was one of the last non-avian dinosaur genera to emerge before the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event. The term Triceratops, which in literal translation means “three-horned...

Rubeosaurus
2010-10-01 12:56:26

Rubeosaurus is a genus of ceratopsian dinosaur from the Two Medicine Formation of the Upper Cretaceous Period (75 to 74 million years ago). It lived in what is now North American and its fossils were discovered in Montana. The type species is R. ovatus. This species was formerly assigned to Styracosaurus, and juvenile specimens that were incorrectly referred to as Brachyceratops, may be...

Montanoceratops
2010-02-04 11:22:59

Montanoceratops, meaning "Montana horned face", is a genus of ceratopsian dinosaur from the Maastrichtian age of the Late Cretaceous Period. It was discovered around 1916 by Barnum Brown at Buffalo Lake, Montana, USA in the St Mary River Formation. It was published as Leptoceratops in 1935 by Brown and his associate Erich M. Schlaikjer. Later evidence showed that this was an inaccurate...

Chasmosaurus
2009-08-18 18:17:54

Chasmosaurus, meaning "opening lizard", is a genus of ceratopsian dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous Period of North America. Its name derives from the Greek chasma: "opening" and sauros: "lizard". The word chasma refers to the large openings in its frill. It was discovered in 1898 by Lawrence Lambe of the Geological Survey of Canada. He only recovered part of the neck frill and not knowing...

Monoclonius
2009-07-24 16:56:51

Monoclonius, meaning "single stem", was a ceratopsian dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous Period. It was discovered at the Judith River Formation in Montana. The name monoclonius is derived from the single root system of its teeth. Monoclonius was first described by Edward Drinker Cope in 1876. It was discovered only 100 miles from the Battle of the Little Bighorn which occurred that same year....

Brachyceratops
2009-07-22 14:08:38

Brachyceratops, or the "short horn-face" is a genus of dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous Period. Its fossils have been found in Alberta, Canada and Montana, USA. It has proven difficult to make an exact model of an adult specimen as only juvenile fossils have been discovered. It was first discovered in the Two Medicine Formation (a geologic formation deposited between 83.5 and 70.5 Mya), on a...

Avaceratops
2009-07-22 13:50:41

Avaceratops, or the "Ava horned face", lived during the Late Cretaceous Period, and is a genus of small ceratopsian dinosaur. They were found in what is now the Northwestern United States. It was first discovered in the Judith River Formation of Montana in 1981. The fossils were found scattered along the remains of a prehistoric stream bed. It is believed that the specimen was buried in the...

Word of the Day
cruet
  • A vial or small glass bottle, especially one for holding vinegar, oil, etc.; a caster for liquids.
This word is Middle English in origin, and ultimately comes from the Old French, diminutive of 'crue,' flask.
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