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Latest Cerebral cortex Stories

2011-05-30 07:25:31

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Precision tinted lenses have been used widely to reduce visual perceptual distortions in poor readers, and are increasingly used for migraine sufferers, but until now the science behind these effects has been unclear. Researchers have now pinpointed the neurological basis for these visual remedies. The new research shows how colored glasses tuned to each migraine sufferer work by normalizing activity in the brain. The researchers saw specific abnormal brain activity...

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2011-05-27 05:50:00

Researchers may have found the science behind the effects of precision-tinted lenses on reducing headaches for migraine sufferers, which could significantly help improve treatment options for the debilitating condition. Led by Jie Huang of Michigan State University's Department of Radiology, researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to show how "precision-tinted lenses normalize brain activity" in migraine headaches, helping to prevent attacks. The study revealed how...

2011-05-26 13:39:58

Precision tinted lenses have been used widely to reduce visual perceptual distortions in poor readers, and are increasingly used for migraine sufferers, but until now the science behind these effects has been unclear. Now research published in the journal Cephalalgia, published by SAGE, uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the first time to suggest a neurological basis for these visual remedies. The new research shows how coloured glasses tuned to each migraine sufferer work...

2011-05-25 14:34:44

Researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have published new data on why the aging brain is less resilient and less capable of learning from life experiences. The findings provide further insight into the cognitive decline associated with aging and neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's. The study is published in the May 25 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. The Mount Sinai team evaluated the prefrontal cortex"”the part of the brain that controls a wide range of cognitive...

2011-05-16 14:56:00

The human brain has yet to explain the origin of one its defining features "“ the deep fissures and convolutions that increase its surface area and allow for rational and abstract thoughts. An international collaboration of scientists from the Yale School of Medicine and Turkey may have discovered humanity's beneficiary "“ a tiny variation within a single gene that determines the formation of brain convolutions "“ they report online May 15 in the journal Nature Genetics. A...

2011-04-29 01:27:41

Biologists at UC San Diego have discovered that electrical oscillations in the brain, long thought to play a role in organizing cognitive functions such as memory, are critically important for the brain to store the information that allows us to navigate through our physical environment. The scientists report in the April 29 issue of the journal Science that neurons called "grid cells" that create maps of the external environment in one portion of our brain require precisely timed electrical...

2011-04-28 21:18:24

The size and shape of the human cerebral cortex, an evolutionary marvel responsible for everything from Shakespeare's poetry to the atomic bomb, are largely influenced by mutations in a single gene, according to a team of researchers led by the Yale School of Medicine and three other universities. The findings, reported April 28 in the American Journal of Human Genetics, are based on a genetic analysis of in one Turkish family and two Pakistani families with offspring born with the most...

2011-04-25 12:49:35

By shedding new light on how cells migrate in the developing brain, researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center also may have found a new mechanism by which other types of cells, including cancer cells, travel within the body. The findings by Jonathan Cooper, Ph.D., member and director of the Hutchinson Center's Basic Sciences Division, and Yves Jossin, Ph.D., a research fellow in Cooper's laboratory, published online April 24 in Nature Neuroscience, could lead to a better...

2011-04-13 21:38:10

Model of Rett syndrome suggests a deficit in processing cues from the environment Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder on the autism spectrum, is marked by relatively normal development in infancy followed by a loss of loss of cognitive, social and language skills starting at 12 to 18 months of age. It is increasingly seen as a disorder of synapses, the connections between neurons that together form brain circuits. What hasn't been clear is why children start out developing normally,...

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2011-04-11 05:45:00

Scientists are developing a technique to map both the connections and functions of nerve cells in the brain together for the first time, bringing them closer to creating a computer model of the human brain. An emerging area of research in neuroscience known as 'connectomics' has parallels to genomics, which maps our genetic make-up. Connectomics aims to detail the brain's synapses and plot how information travels through the brain. Understanding how perceptions, sensations and thoughts are...


Latest Cerebral cortex Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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