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Latest Cerebral cortex Stories

Monkeys Deconstruct The World Through Triangular Grids
2012-10-29 09:16:42

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at Emory University have shown that some primates visually deconstruct the world through triangular grids. According to their report in the journal Nature, the scientists have identified grid cells in the brains of rhesus monkeys that fire in triangular patterns as their eyes scan a scene. Uncovering this brain activity in primates could have larger ramifications as the grid cells are connected to how we view and recall...

Most Annoying Sound Ever
2012-10-13 09:14:36

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online There are noises that set our teeth on edge, make us recoil, and generally unnerve us. For me, that noise is the sound of someone popping his or her back. Scientists from Newcastle University and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging say heightened activity between the emotional and auditory areas of the brain can explain why the sound of chalk on a blackboard, a knife on a bottle, or a joint popping is so unpleasant. A new...

Bird Brains Help In Study Of The Mammalian Neocortex
2012-10-02 11:02:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Humans and other mammals have a seemingly unique part of the brain called the neocortex, which is a layered structure on the outer surface where higher-order processing is thought to occur. A new study from the University of Chicago found similar cells in the brains of birds, but in a vastly different anatomical structure. Confirming a 50-year hypothesis about the identity of a mysterious structure in the bird brain, the new study...

Self-awareness In Humans Is More Intricate Than Previously Thought
2012-08-23 07:18:36

Ancient Greek philosophers considered the ability to "know thyself" as the pinnacle of humanity. Now, thousands of years later, neuroscientists are trying to decipher precisely how the human brain constructs our sense of self. Self-awareness is defined as being aware of oneself, including one's traits, feelings, and behaviors. Neuroscientists have believed that three brain regions are critical for self-awareness: the insular cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the medial prefrontal...

2012-08-20 22:19:47

Research results reported in Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience Amputation disrupts not only the peripheral nervous system but also central structures of the brain. While the brain is able to adapt and compensate for injury in certain conditions, in amputees the traumatic event prevents adaptive cortical changes. A group of scientists reports adaptive plastic changes in an amputee's brain following implantation of multielectrode arrays inside peripheral nerves. Their results are...

Study Reveals Brain's Mysterious Switchboard Operator
2012-08-17 16:08:49

A mysterious region deep in the human brain could be where we sort through the onslaught of stimuli from the outside world and focus on the information most important to our behavior and survival, Princeton University researchers have found. The researchers report in the journal Science that an area of our brain called the pulvinar regulates communication between clusters of brain cells as our brain focuses on the people and objects that need our attention. Like a switchboard operator, the...

Brain Power, Not Muscle Strength Related To Force Of Karate Punch
2012-08-16 12:29:05

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Brain scans of karate experts recently showed distinctive features. Researchers believe that the images show how the ability to punch for black belts and karate novices could be related to a certain feature in the brain. The researchers, hailing from Imperial College London and University College London, discovered differences in the structure of the connection between brain regions, otherwise known as white matter. To begin,...

2012-08-10 02:54:34

Scientists from The Scripps Research Institute have identified a new stem cell population that may be responsible for giving birth to the neurons responsible for higher thinking. The finding also paves the way for scientists to produce these neurons in culture–a first step in developing better treatments for cognitive disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism, which result from disrupted connections among these brain cells. Published in the August 10, 2012 issue of the journal...

Imaging Neural Pathways In Brain Show Intelligence Levels
2012-08-02 12:51:02

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online The brain is an intricate part of the body to say the least. And new research has focused on the effect of neural connectivity on one area of these intricacies, imaging a person's brain to estimate their level of intelligence. Researchers have long thought that overall brain size can affect individual variations in intelligence. A past study delved into this particular topic and demonstrated that the brain´s lateral...


Latest Cerebral cortex Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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