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Latest Cerebral cortex Stories

2011-10-13 09:36:51

New research suggests the growth rate of the brain's cerebral cortex in babies born prematurely may predict how well they are able to think, speak, plan and pay attention later in childhood. The research is published in the October 12, 2011, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The cerebral cortex is the outer layer of the brain covering the cerebrum, and is responsible for cognitive functions, such as language, memory, attention and thought....

2011-10-13 05:32:04

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- The bigger the better! New research shows that may be true when dealing with the brains of premature babies. The research suggests the growth rate of a premature baby's cerebral cortex may predict how well they are able to think, speak, plan and pay attention later in childhood. "The period before a full-term birth is critical for brain development. Problems occurring at this time have long-term consequences, and it appears that preterm birth affects brain growth,"...

2011-09-19 18:49:43

Call a bird "birdbrained" and they may call "fowl." Cornell University researchers have proven that the capacity for learning in birds is not linked to overall brain size, but to the relative size and proportion of their specific brain regions. Songbirds with upper brain regions that are larger in relation to lower regions have a greater capacity for learning songs. Higher brain areas control the majority of cognitive and learning functions, while lower brain areas control more motor...

2011-09-15 20:58:35

Researchers already know that chronic misuse of alcohol can cause widespread damage to the brain. While previous studies examined cortical atrophy in individuals with alcoholism, none examined alcohol-associated atrophy using cortical thickness measurements to obtain a regional mapping of tissue loss across the full cortical surface. This study does so, finding that alcohol damage occurs in gradations: the more alcohol consumed, the greater the damage. Results will be published in the...

2011-09-15 05:15:33

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A new study shows chronic drinking leads to reduced cortical thickness in brain regions, and the more alcohol you consume, the greater the damage. Researchers compared high-resolution structural magnetic resonance scans from 65 participants in two groups: 31 abstinent alcoholic participants and 34 nonalcoholic control participants. The images were used to create cortical-surface models. "Before advances in neuroimaging technology, the degree to which alcohol...

2011-09-08 20:46:48

Access to health insurance top indicator for better outcomes among undocumented children Shakespeare famously referred to "the mind's eye," but scientists at USC now have also identified a "mind's touch." USC scientists have discovered that as you look at an object, your brain not only processes what the object looks like, but remembers what it feels like to touch it as well. This connection is so strong that a computer examining data coming only from the part of your brain that...

2011-08-31 12:41:15

How the brain controls impulsive behavior may be significantly different than psychologists have thought for the last 40 years. That is the unexpected conclusion of a study by an international team of neuroscientists published in the Aug. 31 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. Impulse control is an important aspect of the brain's executive functions — the procedures that it uses to control its own activity. Problems with impulse control are involved in ADHD and a number of other...

2011-08-29 20:39:55

The latest Perspectives in General Physiology series examines the mechanisms of visual, aural, olfactory, and tactile processes that inform us about the environment. The series appears in the September 2011 issue of the Journal of General Physiology (www.jgp.org). Everything that mammals perceive about the environment is based on the transmission to the brain of signals originating in sensory organs such as the eye, ear, nose, and skin. As described by UCLA researchers Robert Farley and...

2011-08-15 15:13:59

New study shows auditory-motor integration located in a different part of the brain Hearing Beethoven while reciting Shakespeare can suppress even a King's stutter, as recently illustrated in the movie "The King's Speech". This dramatic but short-lived effect of hiding the sound of one's own speech indicates that the integration of hearing and motor functions plays some role in the fluency (or dysfluency) of speech. New research has shown that in adults who have stuttered since childhood the...

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2011-08-11 06:20:51

Like explorers mapping a new planet, scientists probing the brain need every type of landmark they can get. Each mountain, river or forest helps scientists find their way through the intricacies of the human brain. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a new technique that provides rapid access to brain landmarks formerly only available at autopsy. Better brain maps will result, speeding efforts to understand how the healthy brain works and...


Latest Cerebral cortex Reference Libraries

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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