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Driving Brain Rhythm Makes Mice More Sensitive To Touch

Driving Brain Rhythm Makes Mice More Sensitive To Touch

David Orenstein, Brown University In a new study researchers show that they could make faint sensations more vivid by triggering a brain rhythm that appears to shift sensory attention. The study in mice, reported in Nature Neuroscience,...

Latest Cerebrum Stories

2014-08-27 23:12:37

Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. (PRWEB) August 27, 2014 Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. Evolution has harmonized the behavior of humans and all other...

2014-08-21 23:00:21

Strongly influenced by their self-interest, humans do not protest being overcompensated, even when there are no consequences, researchers in Georgia State University’s Brains and Behavior Program have found. Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) August 22, 2014 Strongly influenced by their self-interest, humans do not protest being overcompensated, even when there are no consequences, researchers in Georgia State University’s Brains and Behavior Program have found. This could imply that humans are less...

brain changes mathematics
2014-08-19 03:30:41

Erin Digitale, Stanford University School of Medicine As children learn basic arithmetic, they gradually switch from solving problems by counting on their fingers to pulling facts from memory. The shift comes more easily for some kids than for others, but no one knows why. Now, new brain-imaging research gives the first evidence drawn from a longitudinal study to explain how the brain reorganizes itself as children learn math facts. A precisely orchestrated group of brain changes, many...

Our Brains Can Judge A Face's Trustworthiness Even When We Can't See It
2014-08-07 03:47:28

New York University Our brains are able to judge the trustworthiness of a face even when we cannot consciously see it, a team of scientists has found. Their findings, which appear in the Journal of Neuroscience, shed new light on how we form snap judgments of others. "Our findings suggest that the brain automatically responds to a face's trustworthiness before it is even consciously perceived," explains Jonathan Freeman, an assistant professor in New York University's Department of...

eye hand coordination
2014-08-05 03:30:55

Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation Research helps understand how brain systems interact to carry out cognitive processes People not only use their eyes to see, but also to move. It takes less than a fraction of a second to execute the loop that travels from the brain to the eyes, and then to the hands and/or arms. Bijan Pesaran is trying to figure out what occurs in the brain during this process. "Eye-hand coordination is the result of a complex interplay between two systems...

2014-08-04 12:52:44

Harvard University Study shows that mice can identify specific odors amid complex olfactory environments For many animals, making sense of the clutter of sensory stimuli is often a matter or literal life or death. Exactly how animals separate objects of interest, such as food sources or the scent of predators, from background information, however, remains largely unknown. Even the extent to which animals can make such distinctions, and how differences between scents might affect the...

2014-08-04 09:42:54

Vanderbilt University Issues of crime and punishment, vengeance and justice date back to the dawn of human history, but it is only in the last few years that scientists have begun exploring the basic nature of the complex neural processes in the brain that underlie these fundamental behaviors. Now a new brain imaging study – published online Aug. 3 by the journal Nature Neuroscience – has identified the brain mechanisms that underlie our judgment of how severely a person who has...

stress and mental illness
2014-08-02 05:31:14

Rayshell Clapper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online People suffer from stress under a litany of situations. Some situations are temporarily stressful and then dissipate while others lead to long-term psychological problems including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It seems that more people these days suffer from the consequences of stress, which leads to many studies about the mental illness. In one study completed by Duke University, the study's senior author Dr. Kafui...

Scientists Discover On-Off Switch To A Person's Consciousness
2014-07-07 14:42:29

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe online An orchestra, consisting of woodwinds, strings, percussion and brass instruments, each work off a score specific to the instrument they are playing. They each contribute a layer to the overall performance that, by themselves, would paint only a limited picture of what the piece was meant to sound like. Imagine Beethoven's 5th Symphony where all you heard were the oboes playing. The conductor, standing before the full written score, is...

2014-07-01 11:43:59

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Cedars-Sinai-led investigators say some brain cells in a structure called the amygdala appear to make judgments based on a viewer's subjective opinions instead of true emotion expressed When evaluating another person's emotions – happy, sad, angry, afraid – humans take cues from facial expressions. Neurons in a part of the brain called the amygdala "fire" in response to the visual stimulation as information is processed by the retina, the amygdala and a...


Latest Cerebrum Reference Libraries

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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