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Blame Your Brain When You Cave To The Craving

Blame Your Brain When You Cave To The Craving

Eric Hopton for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If you have ever succumbed to a craving for high-calorie snacks, and most of us surely have, you may not feel quite so bad after reading a study by the School of Public Health and Health...

Latest Cerebrum Stories

Brain's Motor Areas Can Directly Turn Down Hearing
2014-09-02 03:06:42

Duke University When we want to listen carefully to someone, the first thing we do is stop talking. The second thing we do is stop moving altogether. This strategy helps us hear better by preventing unwanted sounds generated by our own movements. This interplay between movement and hearing also has a counterpart deep in the brain. Indeed, indirect evidence has long suggested that the brain's motor cortex, which controls movement, somehow influences the auditory cortex, which gives rise...

angry face
2014-08-31 07:29:39

Chuck Bednar for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Regardless of age, race, gender or nationality, all people make the same facial expression when they’re angry, experts from the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) and Australia’s Griffith University report in the latest online edition of Evolution and Human Behavior. The study authors call it the universal “anger face,” noting that it is characterized by a lowered brow, a thinning of the lips and a flaring of the...

2014-08-27 23:12:37

Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. (PRWEB) August 27, 2014 Casey Diekman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), is helping to gain greater insight into the biological clock that sets the pace for daily life. Evolution has harmonized the behavior of humans and all other...

gamma rhythm
2014-08-25 03:30:14

David Orenstein, Brown University In a new study researchers show that they could make faint sensations more vivid by triggering a brain rhythm that appears to shift sensory attention. The study in mice, reported in Nature Neuroscience, provides the first direct evidence that the brain’s “gamma” rhythms have a causal role in processing the sense of touch. By striking up the right rhythm in the right brain region at the right time, Brown University neuroscientists report that they...

2014-08-21 23:00:21

Strongly influenced by their self-interest, humans do not protest being overcompensated, even when there are no consequences, researchers in Georgia State University’s Brains and Behavior Program have found. Atlanta, GA (PRWEB) August 22, 2014 Strongly influenced by their self-interest, humans do not protest being overcompensated, even when there are no consequences, researchers in Georgia State University’s Brains and Behavior Program have found. This could imply that humans are less...

sleep disturbances with age
2014-08-21 05:23:23

Bonnie Prescott, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center A group of neurons are found to function as a 'sleep switch' in the brain As people grow older, they often have difficulty falling asleep and staying asleep, and tend to awaken too early in the morning. In individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, this common and troubling symptom of aging tends to be especially pronounced, often leading to nighttime confusion and wandering. Now, a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess...

fit and smart
2014-08-20 05:27:56

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Youngsters who are more physically fit have more fibrous and compact white-matter tracts in the brain than their less-fit counterparts, according to new research appearing in the August 19 edition of the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Pittsburgh, the University of Iowa and Michigan State University recruited two dozen 9- and 10-year-old...

brain changes mathematics
2014-08-19 03:30:41

Erin Digitale, Stanford University School of Medicine As children learn basic arithmetic, they gradually switch from solving problems by counting on their fingers to pulling facts from memory. The shift comes more easily for some kids than for others, but no one knows why. Now, new brain-imaging research gives the first evidence drawn from a longitudinal study to explain how the brain reorganizes itself as children learn math facts. A precisely orchestrated group of brain changes, many...

Our Brains Can Judge A Face's Trustworthiness Even When We Can't See It
2014-08-07 03:47:28

New York University Our brains are able to judge the trustworthiness of a face even when we cannot consciously see it, a team of scientists has found. Their findings, which appear in the Journal of Neuroscience, shed new light on how we form snap judgments of others. "Our findings suggest that the brain automatically responds to a face's trustworthiness before it is even consciously perceived," explains Jonathan Freeman, an assistant professor in New York University's Department of...

eye hand coordination
2014-08-05 03:30:55

Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation Research helps understand how brain systems interact to carry out cognitive processes People not only use their eyes to see, but also to move. It takes less than a fraction of a second to execute the loop that travels from the brain to the eyes, and then to the hands and/or arms. Bijan Pesaran is trying to figure out what occurs in the brain during this process. "Eye-hand coordination is the result of a complex interplay between two systems...


Latest Cerebrum Reference Libraries

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
virgule
  • A punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information.
  • A little rod; a twig.
This word comes from the Late Latin 'virgula,' accentual mark, a diminutive of 'virga,' rod.
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