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Latest Cerebrum Stories

2012-11-01 23:09:08

There are a growing number of clues that immune and inflammatory mechanisms are important for the biology of schizophrenia. In a new study in Biological Psychiatry, Dr. Mar Fatjó-Vilas and colleagues explored the impact of the interleukin-1β gene (IL1β) on brain function alterations associated with schizophrenia. Fatjó-Vilas said that "this study is a contribution to the relatively new field of 'functional imaging genetics' which appears to be...

Prefrontal Cortex Controls Habits
2012-10-30 19:33:47

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Neuroscientists have identified a region of the brain that is capable of switching between new and old habits. A new study by MIT neuroscientists has found a wall region of the brain's prefrontal cortex is responsible for moment-by-moment control of which habits are switched on at a given time. “We´ve always thought – and I still do – that the value of a habit is you don´t have to think about it. It...

Monkeys Deconstruct The World Through Triangular Grids
2012-10-29 09:16:42

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at Emory University have shown that some primates visually deconstruct the world through triangular grids. According to their report in the journal Nature, the scientists have identified grid cells in the brains of rhesus monkeys that fire in triangular patterns as their eyes scan a scene. Uncovering this brain activity in primates could have larger ramifications as the grid cells are connected to how we view and recall...

Most Annoying Sound Ever
2012-10-13 09:14:36

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online There are noises that set our teeth on edge, make us recoil, and generally unnerve us. For me, that noise is the sound of someone popping his or her back. Scientists from Newcastle University and the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging say heightened activity between the emotional and auditory areas of the brain can explain why the sound of chalk on a blackboard, a knife on a bottle, or a joint popping is so unpleasant. A new...

The Sleeping Brain Behaves As If It's Remembering Something
2012-10-08 07:17:17

UCLA researchers have for the first time measured the activity of a brain region known to be involved in learning, memory and Alzheimer's disease during sleep. They discovered that this part of the brain behaves as if it's remembering something, even under anesthesia, a finding that counters conventional theories about memory consolidation during sleep. The research team simultaneously measured the activity of single neurons from multiple parts of the brain involved in memory formation....

Bird Brains Help In Study Of The Mammalian Neocortex
2012-10-02 11:02:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Humans and other mammals have a seemingly unique part of the brain called the neocortex, which is a layered structure on the outer surface where higher-order processing is thought to occur. A new study from the University of Chicago found similar cells in the brains of birds, but in a vastly different anatomical structure. Confirming a 50-year hypothesis about the identity of a mysterious structure in the bird brain, the new study...

Fear Is Hard To Forget For Adolescents
2012-09-28 08:44:42

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College recently discovered that fear is difficult for teenagers to remove, as they may feel a strong sense of threat even when the danger is gone. It is possible that stress and anxiety is highest at this time and the study is the first to examine “fear acquisition” and “fear extinction learning” in the brains of mice, which are somewhat similar to the neural networks...

Food Choices Are Controlled By The Brain
2012-09-27 09:43:07

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) recently discovered that an individual´s internal struggle to choose between healthy and unhealthy food items is based off of neural processes in the brain. The findings of the study were recently published in The Journal of Neuroscience. "We seem to have independent systems capable of guiding our decisions, and in situations like this one, these systems...

Chocolate Cravings Connected To Brain
2012-09-21 08:50:55

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A new study has revealed that the brain might have chocolate temptations due to the production of a natural chemical that is similar to opium. The researchers looked at a group of rats to better understand the urge to overeat chocolate candies. They injected a drug that sent an artificial boost to the neostriatum, a region in the brain. With the injection, the rats ate more than double the number of M&M chocolates than they...


Latest Cerebrum Reference Libraries

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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