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Latest Cerebrum Stories

2012-04-04 20:52:14

Bonn scientists prove that deep brain stimulation also has long-lasting effects People with severe depression are constantly despondent, lacking in drive, withdrawn and no longer feel joy. Most suffer from anxiety and the desire to take their own life. Approximately one out of every five people in Germany suffers from depression in the course of his/her life — sometimes resulting in suicide. People with depression are frequently treated with psychotherapy and medication. "However,...

2012-04-04 20:28:09

Primitive consciousness emerges first as you awaken from anesthesia Awakening from anesthesia is often associated with an initial phase of delirious struggle before the full restoration of awareness and orientation to one's surroundings. Scientists now know why this may occur: primitive consciousness emerges first. Using brain imaging techniques in healthy volunteers, a team of scientists led by Adjunct Professor Harry Scheinin, M.D. from the University of Turku, Turku, Finland in...

Seeing Beyond The Visual Cortex
2012-04-03 04:00:35

[ Watch the Video ] Research could lead to new rehabilitative therapies when visual cortex is damaged It's a chilling thought--losing the sense of sight because of severe injury or damage to the brain's visual cortex. But, is it possible to train a damaged or injured brain to "see" again after such a catastrophic injury? Yes, according to Tony Ro, a neuroscientist at the City College of New York, who is artificially recreating a condition called blindsight in his lab. "Blindsight...

2012-03-22 09:35:05

Both human infants and baboons have a stronger preference for using their right hand to gesture than for a simple grasping task, supporting the hypothesis that language development, which is lateralized in the left part of the human brain, is based on a common gestural communication system. The results are reported in the Mar. 21 issue of the open access journal PLoS ONE. The researchers, led by Helene Meunier of the University of Strasbourg in France, found that hand preference of both...

2012-03-21 14:31:05

Readers whose mother tongue is Arabic have more challenges reading in Arabic than native Hebrew or English speakers have reading their native languages, because the two halves of the brain divide the labor differently when the brain processes Arabic than when it processes Hebrew or English. That is the result of a new study conducted by two University of Haifa researchers, Dr. Raphiq Ibrahim of the Edmond J. Safra Brain Research Center for the Study of Learning Disabilities and the Learning...

2012-03-21 00:30:56

Scans reveal how genes alter circuit hub to shape temperament -- NIH study A personality profile marked by overly gregarious yet anxious behavior is rooted in abnormal development of a circuit hub buried deep in the front center of the brain, say scientists at the National Institutes of Health. They used three different types of brain imaging to pinpoint the suspect brain area in people with Williams syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by these behaviors. Matching the scans to...

2012-03-15 12:37:19

Evidence Builds That Meditation Strengthens The Brain Earlier evidence out of UCLA suggested that meditating for years thickens the brain (in a good way) and strengthens the connections between brain cells. Now a further report by UCLA researchers suggests yet another benefit. Eileen Luders, an assistant professor at the UCLA Laboratory of Neuro Imaging, and colleagues, have found that long-term meditators have larger amounts of gyrification ("folding" of the cortex, which may allow the...

2012-03-15 05:38:00

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- My toy, my snack, my juice box, kids can be selfish! A new study suggests that age-associated improvements in the ability to consider others are linked with maturation of the brain region involved in self control. The study may help to explain why children can be selfish when they are taught better and could improve educational strategies that are designed to encourage successful social behavior. Social interactions involve two parties who want the greatest possible...

2012-03-09 02:22:24

Caltech biologists locate brain's processing point for acoustic signals essential to human communication In both animals and humans, vocal signals used for communication contain a wide array of different sounds that are determined by the vibrational frequencies of vocal cords. For example, the pitch of someone's voice, and how it changes as they are speaking, depends on a complex series of varying frequencies. Knowing how the brain sorts out these different frequencies–which are...

2012-03-08 00:52:49

Neuron paper by UB researchers reveals why chronic stress in adolescence impairs memory, may trigger mental illness Chronic stress has a more powerful effect on the brain during adolescence than in adulthood and now there's proof at the molecular level. "We have identified a causal link between molecules and behaviors involved in stress responses," says Zhen Yan, PhD, a professor in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics in the UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. "It's...


Latest Cerebrum Reference Libraries

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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