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Latest Cerebrum Stories

2012-02-14 12:41:44

Researchers of the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch have now identified and described a molecular mechanism underlying the most common malformation of the brain in humans. In holoprosencephaly (HPE), the forebrain (prosencephalon) is only incompletely formed. Here a binding site (receptor) for cholesterol plays a key role. If this receptor is defective, specific signals cannot be received, and the forebrain cannot separate into two hemispheres, as...

2012-02-13 23:13:22

It´s Valentine´s Day, he forgot to bring flowers, and somehow that painfully sad look on her face is simply not registering in his mind.  Could be it´s a problem in his prefrontal cortex? Neuropsychology researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital — The Neuro, McGill University, have found that two areas of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are critical for either detecting or distinguishing emotions from facial expressions.  People with damage...

Researchers Develop Cerebral Cortex Cells From Skin
2012-02-13 13:44:33

Researchers at the University of Cambridge report that they created cerebral cortex cells from a small sample of human skin. The new development could pave the way for techniques to explore a wide range of diseases such as autism and Alzheimer's. The findings could also enable scientists to study how the human cerebral cortex develops -- and how it "wires up" and how that can go wrong. "This approach gives us the ability to study human brain development and disease in ways that were...

Brain Stimulation Could Boost Memory In Alzheimer's Patients
2012-02-10 05:10:41

Neuroscientists at UCLA have found a way to help improve a human's memory by stimulating a part of the brain. The research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, could lead to a new method for boosting memory in Alzheimer's patients. The team focused on a brain site known as the entorhinal cortex during their study, which is an area considered to be the doorway to an area that helps form and store memories. "The entorhinal cortex is the golden gate to the brain's memory...

2012-02-09 00:52:52

Strategy for maximizing uncertain rewards shows in MRI, math models Life shrouds most choices in mystery. Some people inch toward a comfortable enough spot and stick close to that rewarding status quo. Out to dinner, they order the usual. Others consider their options systematically or randomly. But many choose to grapple with the uncertainty head on. "Explorers" order the special because they aren't sure they'll like it. It's a strategy of maximizing rewards by discovering whether as yet...

2012-02-06 22:20:04

Researchers have found a way to study how our brains assess the behavior — and likely future actions — of others during competitive social interactions. Their study, described in a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the first to use a computational approach to tease out differing patterns of brain activity during these interactions, the researchers report. “When players compete against each other in a game, they try to make a mental model of...

2012-02-02 09:20:17

Findings in animals could lead to new treatments for people suffering from anxiety disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder Rutgers scientists have uncovered genetic clues as to why some mice no longer in danger are still fearful while others are resilient to traumatic experiences — knowledge that could help those suffering with crippling anxiety and PTSD. "Our work with mice demonstrates how genes play a role in developing and extinguishing pathological fear like Post...

2012-02-02 07:44:24

Over the first few years of life, human cognition continues to develop, soaking up information and experiences from the environment and far surpassing the abilities of even our nearest primate relatives. In a study published online today in Genome Research, researchers have identified extended synaptic development in the human brain relative to other primates, a finding that sheds new light on the biology and evolution of human cognition. "Why can we absorb environmental information during...

2012-02-01 10:33:46

Hyperconnectivity triggered by loss of PTEN gene can be blocked by treatment with rapamycin New research from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) might help explain how a gene mutation found in some autistic individuals leads to difficulties in processing auditory cues and paying spatial attention to sound. The study has found that when a suspected autism gene called PTEN is deleted from auditory cortical neurons–the main workhorses of the brain's sound-processing...

2012-01-31 06:06:15

New location of critical area provides hints on origin of language Scientists have long believed that human speech is processed towards the back of the brain's cerebral cortex, behind auditory cortex where all sounds are received – a place famously known as Wernicke's area after the German neurologist who proposed this site in the late 1800s based on his study of brain injuries and strokes. But, now, research that analyzed more than 100 imaging studies concludes that Wernicke's...


Latest Cerebrum Reference Libraries

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.