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Latest Cerebrum Stories

3D Model Of The World's Most Famous Amnesiac's Brain
2014-01-29 05:33:30

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The brain of the famous amnesiac Henry Gustav Molaison, who died in 2008, has been painstakingly digitized in 3D, and is now available to explore online right down to the cellular architecture. Molaison is one of the most famous patients in the history of brain research. In 1953, an experimental surgery intended to relieve his severe epilepsy rendered him with the unexpected ability to remember events and facts he knew before the...

Brain Similarities In Humans And Monkeys
2014-01-29 04:46:02

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new study from Oxford University researchers suggests a surprising degree of similarity in the organization of brain regions that control language and complex thought processes in humans and monkeys, as well as key differences. The team's finding demonstrate valuable insights into the evolutionary processes that established the link between humans and other primates and what made humans distinctly different. "We tend to think that...

2014-01-22 11:09:41

In Europe as well as worldwide, cocaine is the second most frequently used drug after cannabis. Chronic cocaine users display worse memory performance, concentration difficulties, and attentional deficits but also their social skills are affected as previous studies at the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Zurich suggested. These investigations also revealed that cocaine users have difficulties to take the mental perspective of others, show less emotional empathy, find it more...

2014-01-21 10:24:45

For first time, PARP-1 enzyme, Sidekick-1 gene implicated in enhancing brain reward system Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified a new molecular mechanism by which cocaine alters the brain's reward circuits and causes addiction. Published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Dr. Eric J. Nestler, MD, PhD, and colleagues, the preclinical research reveals how an abundant enzyme and synaptic gene affect a key reward...

2014-01-20 16:21:45

NEW YORK, Jan. 20, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified a new molecular mechanism by which cocaine alters the brain's reward circuits and causes addiction. Published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by Dr. Eric J. Nestler, MD, PhD, and colleagues, the preclinical research reveals how an abundant enzyme and synaptic gene affect a key reward circuit in the brain, changing the...

2014-01-15 23:24:47

Five Healthy Habits to Help You Cope With Food Cravings and Eat Better Cleveland, Ohio (PRWEB) January 15, 2014 “Mindful eating is about consuming food with more conscious awareness,” said Susan Albers, a clinical psychologist at the Cleveland Clinic and author of the new book, “EatQ: Unlock the Weight Loss Power of Emotional Intelligence,” and the books “50 Ways to Soothe Yourself Without Food” and “Eating Mindfully.” Eating mindfully prevents “autopilot eating”...

2014-01-15 10:34:13

Everybody feels pain differently, and brain structure may hold the clue to these differences. In a study published in the current online issue of the journal Pain, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center have shown that the brain's structure is related to how intensely people perceive pain. "We found that individual differences in the amount of grey matter in certain regions of the brain are related to how sensitive different people are to pain," said Robert Coghill, Ph.D.,...

Emotions Cause Physiological Changes
2014-01-01 08:10:51

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online That tightening you feel in your chest when you’re anxious, or that warm sensation that washes over your entire body when you feel loved – those sensations aren’t just in your head, according to new research which maps the physiological changes that accompany different emotions. The study, which appears in the journal Proceedings of The National Academy of Sciences, said that feelings can alter both our mental and physical...

Cramming Does Not Help Create Long-Term Memories
2013-12-26 03:45:48

Ranjini Raghunath for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Those last-minute cramming sessions fueled by instant noodles and coffee might help you pass your exams. But they won’t help your brain remember things in the long term. Scientists have long known that learning with breaks in between helps your brain remember things longer than when you try to cram it all in one go. Called the “spacing effect,” the phenomenon was first described by German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus in...

Alzheimer’s Disease Tracked From The Beginning
2013-12-23 04:42:10

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online By combining high-resolution functional MRI (fMRI) imaging scans in Alzheimer’s disease patients with mouse models of the neurodegenerative condition, researchers from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have gained new insights into how, where and why the disease starts and spreads. The study, which was published Sunday in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience, will help enhance the medical community’s understanding...


Latest Cerebrum Reference Libraries

Midbrain
2013-07-25 15:13:23

The midbrain, also known as the mesencephalon is the part of the brain most responsible for vision, motor control, arousal, temperature regulation, alertness and hearing. Formation and Orientation The midbrain is found under the cerebral cortex and above the hindbrain. The mesencephalon is not divided into any other portions of the brain unlike the other two vesicles that stem from the neural tube. There are four separate lobes on the side of the cerebral aqueduct within the...

Brain
2013-03-05 13:54:00

Formation and Orientation The development of the brain is broken down into stages. The basic evolution begins in the third week of the embryonic process where the neural plate is formed. By week four, the neural plate has developed into the neural tube. The anterior part of the tube, the telencephalon, grows rapidly as it prepares to later give way to the brain. As time goes on, cells begin to classify themselves as either neurons or glial cells, thus determining their functions. Glial...

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Word of the Day
bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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