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Latest Cervical vertebrae Stories

How Owls Turn Their Heads 020113
2013-02-01 11:10:08

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Where do art and medical science meet? This year, apparently, they meet at the neck of an owl. A team of medical illustrators and neurological imaging experts from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has finally discovered how owls can almost fully rotate their heads without damaging the delicate blood vessels in their neck. Unlike most animals which are far more vulnerable to neck injuries, the nocturnal birds are able to...

2011-10-14 09:10:38

From blue whales to earthworms, a common mechanism gives shape to living beings Why don't our arms grow from the middle of our bodies? The question isn't as trivial as it appears. Vertebrae, limbs, ribs, tailbone ... in only two days, all these elements take their place in the embryo, in the right spot and with the precision of a Swiss watch. Intrigued by the extraordinary reliability of this mechanism, biologists have long wondered how it works. Now, researchers at EPFL (Ecole...

2011-07-27 13:37:18

A high school football player's broken neck "“ from which he's recovered "“ has yielded breakthrough biomechanical data on cervical spine injuries that could ultimately affect safety and equipment standards for athletes. University of New Hampshire associate professor of kinesiology Erik Swartz collaborated on the study, which appears in a letter in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine. Swartz and lead author Steven Broglio of the University of Michigan captured this...

2011-07-25 07:01:00

BROOMFIELD, Colo., July 25, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Lanx®, Inc., a privately held medical device company focused on developing and commercializing innovative devices for spinal surgery, announced its Aspen(TM) Spinous Process Fixation System (Aspen) was featured in two poster presentations at The 18th International Meeting on Advanced Spine Techniques (IMAST) in Copenhagen, Denmark, July 13th to 16th. Dan Gladney, Chief Executive Officer, Lanx, commented, "These scientific...

2011-05-06 13:52:43

As a rule all mammals have the same number of vertebrae in their necks regardless of whether they are a giraffe, a mouse, or a human. But both sloths and manatees are exceptions to this rule having abnormal numbers of cervical vertebrae. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal EvoDevo shows how such different species have evolved their unusual necks. Birds, reptiles and amphibians have varying number of vertebrae in their necks, swans have 22-25, but mammals, regardless...

2011-02-18 07:00:00

SAN DIEGO, Feb. 18, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Zimmer Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: ZMH; SIX: ZMH), a leader in musculoskeletal care, today announced it has received FDA clearance for the TM-S Trabecular Metal(TM) Cervical Interbody Fusion Device. The TM-S system is the industry's first cervical interbody device incorporating porous metal technology, and the first Zimmer Trabecular Metal device for cervical interbody fusion (IBF) in the United States. The TM-S system is constructed from Zimmer's...

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2010-12-09 10:14:37

Researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa have developed innovative techniques that could have profound effects on congenital cervical vertebrae malformation research. In the cover-featured research article of the November issue of Molecular Reproduction and Development, researchers looked into congenital cervical vertebrae malformation in humans that can cause neural problems and increase susceptibility to stillbirth in women. Research advancement on...

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2010-10-19 06:15:00

New research by scientists at the University of Cambridge in England gives insight into how sloths, one of the few mammals with more than seven neck vertebrae, evolved their uniquely long necks. The mystery of how the three-toed sloth came to have as many as 10 neck vertebrae has long puzzled scientists, given that most of the 5,000 mammal species have exactly seven vertebrae in their necks. Other animals, such as birds and lizards, vary greatly in the number of vertebrae in their...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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