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Latest Chemical oceanography Stories

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2009-11-03 09:18:21

Deep-sea ecosystems occupying 60% of the Earth's surface could be vulnerable to the effects of global warming warn scientists writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "Global-scale models are now estimating that climate change will affect the supply of organic matter from surface waters upon which most deep-sea ecosystems depend," says co-author Dr Henry Ruhl of the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton. Most scientists believe that the burning of fossil fuels (gas,...

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2009-10-26 15:28:49

Stony Brook University researchers find elevated carbon dioxide concentrations impede growth and survival of bivalve larvae Relatively minor increases in ocean acidity brought about by high levels of carbon dioxide have significant detrimental effects on the growth, development, and survival of hard clams, bay scallops, and Eastern oysters, according to researchers at Stony Brook University's School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences. In one of the first studies looking at the effect of ocean...

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2009-10-10 08:36:32

Scientists work to explain why massive "dead zones" have been invading the Pacific Northwest's near-shore waters since 2002 Yet another ecological scourge may earn a place on the ever-lengthening list of problems potentially caused by climate change: the formation of some so-called "dead zones""”huge expanses of ocean that lose virtually all of their marine life at depth during the summer. Possible connections between climate change and the relatively recent formation of dead zones in...

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2009-09-16 10:24:52

Scientists in Pennsylvania report that boosting production of crops used to make biofuels could make a difficult task to shrink a vast, oxygen-depleted "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico more difficult. The zone, which reached the size of Massachusetts in 2008, forms in summer and threatens marine life and jobs in the region. Their study is scheduled for the Oct. 1 issue of ACS' semi-monthly journal Environmental Science & Technology. Christine Costello and W. Michael Griffin and...

2009-09-02 08:10:00

GEOLOGY includes studies of the Fraser River delta, British Columbia; the impact of global climate change on microfossil communities; alluvial fans in Taiwan; earthquake ruptures; earth-flows along the Eel River; Mediterranean fossil whales; collecting bias and carnivorous dinosaurs of the Kem Kem Formation, Morocco; and the effects Hurricanes Cindy, Katrina, and Rita on barrier island systems. GSA TODAY tells a 20-million-year-old story of interactions among the Columbia River, volcanic...

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2009-08-24 13:30:21

A marine scientist said Alaska's $4.6 billion fishing industry might be in danger because marine waters in the area are turning acidic from absorbing greenhouse gases faster than tropical waters, The Associated Press reported. Jeremy Mathis, a chemical oceanographer at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, said the same things that make Alaska's marine waters among the most productive in the world - cold, shallow depths and abundant marine life "“ also make them the most vulnerable to...

2009-08-13 15:45:42

 The same things that make Alaska's marine waters among the most productive in the world may also make them the most vulnerable to ocean acidification. According to new findings by a University of Alaska Fairbanks scientist, Alaska's oceans are becoming increasingly acidic, which could damage Alaska's king crab and salmon fisheries.This spring, chemical oceanographer Jeremy Mathis returned from a cruise armed with seawater samples collected from the depths of the Gulf of Alaska. When he...

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2009-08-06 10:15:00

The burning of fossil fuels has released tremendous amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere, significantly impacting global climate. Were it not for the absorption of CO2 by the oceans, the alarming growth of atmospheric CO2 concentration would be substantially greater than it is. However, this beneficial role of the oceans as a CO2 "scrubber" does not come without undesired consequences. When dissolved, CO2 acts as an acid, and lowers seawater pH. Since the...

0fcede06ea6cf5ad4ca0c4a8023b331a
2009-08-04 09:45:00

Climate change, land-use patterns are culprits, scientists to report at Ecological Society of America conferenceWhat do the Gulf of Mexico's "dead zone," global climate change, and acid rain have in common? They're all a result of human impacts to Earth's biology, chemistry and geology, and the natural cycles that involve all three.On August 4-5, 2009, scientists who study such cycles--biogeochemists--will convene at a special series of sessions at the Ecological Society of America (ESA)'s...

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2009-07-31 08:05:00

This summer, one of the world's leading ocean science bodies, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization's (UNESCO's) and Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) adopted the new international thermodynamic equation of state for seawater called TEOS-10. A complex, dynamic mixture of dissolved minerals, salts, and organic material, seawater has historically presented difficulties in terms of determining its physical chemical properties.For 30 years, climate...


Latest Chemical oceanography Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

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Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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