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Latest Chemical oceanography Stories

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2009-06-18 13:00:00

University of Michigan aquatic ecologist Donald Scavia and his colleagues say this year's Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" could be one of the largest on record, continuing a decades-long trend that threatens the health of a half-billion-dollar fishery. The scientists' latest forecast, released today, calls for a Gulf dead zone of between 7,450 and 8,456 square miles"”an area about the size of New Jersey. Most likely, this summer's Gulf dead zone will blanket about 7,980 square miles, roughly...

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2009-06-17 12:35:00

Changes in ocean chemistry "” a consequence of increased carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from human industrial activity "” could cause U.S. shellfish revenues to drop significantly in the next 50 years, according to a new study by researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).Intensive burning of fossil fuels and deforestation over the last two centuries have increased CO2 levels in the atmosphere by almost 40 percent. The oceans have absorbed about one-third of...

2009-06-01 08:35:00

Possible job cuts and revenue loss as a result of ocean acidificationOcean acidification, a direct result of increased CO2 emission, is set to change the Earth's marine ecosystems forever and may have a direct impact on our economy, resulting in substantial revenue declines and job losses.Intensive fossil-fuel burning and deforestation over the last two centuries have increased atmospheric CO2 levels by almost 40%, which has in turn fundamentally altered ocean chemistry by acidifying surface...

2009-05-28 15:26:08

U.S. marine scientists say they have discovered that rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide are threatening shellfish populations in many ecosystems. The researchers, led by ecologist Whitman Miller of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, said the increasing CO2 levels are contributing to the acidification of open ocean, coastal and estuarine waters. For shellfish and other organisms having calcium carbonate shells and structures, the problem begins when atmospheric CO2...

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2009-05-27 08:32:14

Overfishing and disease have decimated shellfish populations in many of the world's temperate estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Smithsonian scientists, led by Whitman Miller, ecologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Md., have discovered another serious threat to these valuable filter feeders"”rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contribute to the acidification of open ocean, coastal and estuarine waters. Their findings are being published in...

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2009-04-28 13:40:00

A $16 million program launched by the UK government will fund a five-year research study on ocean acidification, BBC News reported. Oceans are becoming more acidic as a result of CO2 from human activities being absorbed by seawater, researchers said, adding that acidification of the oceans will be one of the major environmental concerns of this century. The 5-year study will have researchers analyzing and assessing how marine ecosystems are affected in the Atlantic, Antarctic and Arctic...

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2009-04-17 14:37:04

New calculations made by marine chemists from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) suggest that low-oxygen "dead zones" in the ocean could expand significantly over the next century. These predictions are based on the fact that, as more and more carbon dioxide dissolves from the atmosphere into the ocean, marine animals will need more oxygen to survive. Concentrations of carbon dioxide are increasing rapidly in the Earth's atmosphere, primarily because of human activities....

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2009-04-10 14:39:09

Bill Deutsch, of Auburn University, has launched a new project that is aimed at reducing farm runoff that has become a driving force behind water pollution in the Gulf of Mexico. The $300,000 project, funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency, will combine the efforts of colleagues in Veracruz, Mexico as a part of a three-year project to monitor pollution levels of water flowing into the Gulf. As a result of the study, Deutsch and colleagues hope to determine new methods that will...

2009-03-20 23:01:44

A U.S. biological oceanographer says acidification could be causing a slow-motion destruction of ocean ecosystems. Victoria Fabry, a visiting researcher at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, said tests show just 48 hours of exposure to slightly corrosive seawater causes mollusc shells to start to dissolve. The university said increasing levels of carbon dioxide could spell ecological disaster to industries dependent on the seas. About a third of...

2009-03-10 13:31:20

A U.S. study suggests the world's coral reefs might begin dissolving if the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide content reaches double pre-industrial levels. Even today, rising carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the resulting effects on ocean water are making it increasingly difficult for coral reefs to grow, said scientists at the Carnegie Institution in Washington and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The researchers said reefs are being impacted by ocean acidification caused by the...


Latest Chemical oceanography Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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