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Latest Chemical oceanography Stories

Anxiety In Fish Caused By Rising Ocean Acidification
2013-12-04 19:35:14

Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego Study shows acidity levels projected by the end of the century results in behavioral changes that could impact feeding, fisheries A new research study combining marine physiology, neuroscience, pharmacology, and behavioral psychology has revealed a surprising outcome from increases of carbon dioxide uptake in the oceans: anxious fish. A growing base of scientific evidence has shown that the absorption of human-produced carbon dioxide...

Ocean Acidity Having Major Impact On Arctic Food Web Species
2013-12-03 06:27:12

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Tiny crustaceans, known as copepods, live just beneath the surface of the ocean. A research expedition to the Arctic, part of the Caitlin Arctic Survey, found that these tiny animals are more likely to battle for survival if ocean acidity continues to rise. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), revealed that copepods that move large distances, migrating vertically across a wide range of pH...

New Generation Of Micro Sensors Developed For Monitoring Ocean Acidification
2013-11-13 14:14:45

National Oceanography Centre, Southampton (UK) The first step in developing a cost-effective micro sensor for long-term monitoring of ocean acidification has been achieved by a team of scientists and engineers. The new technology, that will measure pH levels in seawater, was developed by engineers from the National Oceanography Centre, in close collaboration with oceanographers from University of Southampton Ocean and Earth Science, which is based at the center. The team successfully...

Feast And Famine For Animals Living On The Abyssal Plain
2013-11-12 11:57:06

[ Watch The Video: Feast and Famine on the Abyssal Plain ] Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute Animals living on the abyssal plains, miles below the ocean surface, don’t usually get much to eat. Their main source of food is ”marine snow”—a slow drift of mucus, fecal pellets, and body parts—that sinks down from the surface waters. However, researchers have long been puzzled by the fact that, over the long term, the steady fall of marine snow cannot account for all the...

Toxic Ocean Conditions During Ancient Extinction Event Analyzed
2013-10-30 04:24:55

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Toxic oxygen-free and hydrogen sulfide-rich ocean conditions that existed during a major extinction event nearly 94 million years ago could repeat themselves in the future, according to new research being published online this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Research, led by biogeochemists at the University of California, Riverside, suggests that the previous estimates of these oxygen-free,...

Receding Ice Exposes Seawater To Carbon Dioxide, Driving Ocean Acidification In The Arctic Ocean
2013-09-13 12:12:21

University of South Florida (USF Health) Acidification of the Arctic Ocean is occurring faster than projected according to new findings published in the journal PLoS One. The increase in rate is being blamed on rapidly melting sea ice, a process that may have important consequences for health of the Arctic ecosystem. Ocean acidification is the process by which pH levels of seawater decrease due to greater amounts of carbon dioxide being absorbed by the oceans from the atmosphere....

X Prize For Measuring Ocean Health
2013-09-10 11:15:29

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Global warming alarmists and deniers alike can probably agree on at least one thing: Scientists need the most accurate data and tools to make their climate assessments. In pursuit of more accurate climate data, the X Prize Foundation has announced a $2-million competition designed to kick-start technology innovations surrounding the accurate measuring of oceanic pH. Climatologists have been warning that the world's oceans are...

Carbon-sequestering Ocean Plants May Handle Climate Changes Over The Long Run
2013-08-26 14:33:35

San Francisco State University A year-long experiment on tiny ocean organisms called coccolithophores suggests that the single-celled algae may still be able to grow their calcified shells even as oceans grow warmer and more acidic in Earth's near future. The study stands in contrast to earlier studies suggesting that coccolithophores would fail to build strong shells in acidic waters. The world's oceans are expected to become more acidic as human activities pump increasing amounts of...

2013-08-06 12:21:53

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz., Aug. 6, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Forests have a limited capacity to soak up atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2), according to a new study from Northern Arizona University. The study, available online in the journal New Phytologist, aimed to explore how rising atmospheric carbon dioxide could alter the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content of ecosystems. By performing tests on subtropical woodland plots over an 11-year period, the researchers found that ecosystem carbon...

Material Fluxes Decoded In The Tropical Ocean
2013-08-02 13:21:50

Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR) Turbulent processes provide important contribution to oxygen supply How is vital oxygen supplied to the tropical ocean? For the first time, oceanographers at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel were able to make quantitative statements regarding this question. They showed that about one third of the oxygen supply in these areas is provided by turbulent processes, such as eddies or internal waves. The study, conducted in the...


Latest Chemical oceanography Reference Libraries

Ocean Acidification
2013-04-01 10:32:20

Ocean acidification is the name that was given to the ongoing decrease in the pH of Earth’s oceans, a cause of the uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. About 30 to 40 percent of the carbon dioxide that is released by humans into the atmosphere dissolves into the lakes, oceans, and rivers. To maintain the chemical equilibrium, some of it reacts with the water to create carbonic acid. Some of these extra carbonic acid molecules react with a water molecule to provide a...

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