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Latest chemical signals Stories

Emotional Communication Uses Sense Of Smell
2012-11-06 12:58:08

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online While is it well known that many species transmit information via chemical signals, the extent to which these chemosignals play a role in human communication is unknown. Researchers from Utrecht University in the Netherlands have investigated whether we humans might actually be able to communicate with each other about our emotional states through chemical signals. The findings of the study were recently published in the journal...

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2011-05-13 03:36:37

Study increases understanding of 'coevolved mutualism' between ants and trees Survival in the depths of the tropical rainforest not only depends on a species' ability to defend itself, but can be reliant on the type of cooperation researchers discovered between ants and tropical trees. The research, published in Biotropica, reveals how the ants use chemical signals on their host tree to distinguish them from competing plant species. Once a competing plant is recognized the ants prune them to...

2011-01-24 15:20:34

Plant biologists have discovered the last major element of the series of chemical signals that one class of plant hormones, called brassinosteroids, send from a protein on the surface of a plant cell to the cell's nucleus. Although many steps of the pathway were already known, new research from a team including Carnegie's Ying Sun and Zhiyong Wang fills in a missing gap about the mechanism through which brassinosteroids cause plant genes to be expressed. Their research, which will be...

2010-10-06 17:18:38

Novelty and complexity are the result of small evolutionary changes, University of Oregon researchers show By reconstructing an ancient protein and tracing how it subtly changed over vast periods of time to produce scores of modern-day descendants, scientists have shown how evolution tinkers with early forms and leaves the impression that complexity evolved many times. Human and other animal cells contain thousands of proteins with functions so diverse and complex that it is often difficult...

2010-09-01 08:00:00

GUILFORD, Conn., Sept. 1 /PRNewswire/ -- Ion Torrent, the semiconductor sequencing company, today announced that it has been selected as one of 31 World Economic Forum Technology Pioneers for 2011. The winning companies were chosen from a field of 330 startups and judged on the impact their innovations are expected to have on the future of business and society. Dr. Jonathan M. Rothberg, Ion Torrent's founder, chairman and CEO, was selected to represent the company at Davos in 2011. He is...

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2009-05-13 13:10:27

A recent study has shown that earwig mothers are able to detect odors from the unhealthiest "nymphs" of their brood and accordingly adjust their behavior to ensure that the fittest young receive more attention than their siblings. Though frequent amongst many higher classes of animals, this study was the first of its kind to demonstrate such behavior in insects. For earwig parents, it seems that the name of the game is favoritism.  When the mother detects chemical signals released from...

2005-10-21 19:41:13

La Jolla, CA - Delving ever deeper into the intricate architecture of the brain, researchers at The Salk Institute have now described how two different types of nerve cells, called neurons, work together in tiny sub-networks to pass on just the right amount and the right kind of sensory information. Their study, published online by Nature Neuroscience, depicts how specific types of inhibitory neurons in the visual cortex of a rat brain are wired to, and "talk" with, discrete excitatory...

2005-08-15 13:10:12

The same family of chemical signals that attracts developing sensory nerves up the spinal cord toward the brain serves to repel motor nerves, sending them in the opposite direction, down the cord and away from the brain, report researchers at the University of Chicago in the September 2005 issue of Nature Neuroscience (available online August 14). The finding may help physicians restore function to people with paralyzing spinal cord injuries. Growing nerve cells send out axons, long narrow...