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Latest Chemical synapse Stories

2014-06-25 10:21:35

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory There are new clues about malfunctions in brain cells that contribute to intellectual disability and possibly other developmental brain disorders. Professor Linda Van Aelst of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has been scrutinizing how the normal version of a protein called OPHN1 helps enable excitatory nerve transmission in the brain, particularly at nerve-cell docking ports containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Her team's new work, published June 24 in...

2014-02-13 08:31:14

TACOMA, Wash., Feb. 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Noted neuroscientist Dr. Rodolfo Llinas and colleagues have published an article reporting that Revalesio's RNS60 improves synaptic transmission. Synapses connect nerve cells and allow communication through the release of neurotransmitters, which are essential for normal function of the nervous system and overall brain activity. In their work, Dr. Llinas and his coworkers used the squid giant synapse, a well-established model for...

2014-02-07 13:22:53

Team sees change in set point in neuromuscular synapses Scientists from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have found a clue as to why muscles weaken with age. In a study published today in The Journal of Neuroscience, they report the first evidence that “set points” in the nervous system are not inalterably determined during development but instead can be reset with age. They observed a change in set point that resulted in...

2014-02-07 13:03:28

Science paper by IST Austria scientists reports first evidence for “microdomain” coupling at a mature central synapse and explores the implications for synaptic plasticity In research published in this week’s online edition of Science (DOI: 10.1126/science.1244811), postdoc Nicholas Vyleta and Professor Peter Jonas of the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) uncover the existence of loose coupling between calcium channels and release sensors of exocytosis at a...

2013-05-30 12:03:56

Breakthrough Could Lead to Better Understanding of Learning and Memory Students preparing for final exams might want to wait before pulling an all-night cram session – at least as far as their neurons are concerned. Carnegie Mellon University neuroscientists have discovered a new intermediate phase in neuronal development during which repeated exposure to a stimulus shrinks synapses. The findings are published in the May 8 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. It's well known that...

2013-04-18 23:27:49

High-powered microscopes open a live look at a process where mutations lead to autism and other diseases Using spinning disk microscopy on barely day-old zebra fish embryos, University of Oregon scientists have gained a new window on how synapse-building components move to worksites in the central nervous system. What researchers captured in these see-through embryos -- in what may be one of the first views of early glutamate-driven synapse formation in a living vertebrate -- were...

2013-01-01 10:47:31

Jackson Laboratory researchers led by Associate Professor Zhong-wei Zhang, Ph.D., have provided direct evidence that a specific neurotransmitter receptor is vital to the process of pruning synapses in the brains of newborn mammals. Faulty pruning at this early developmental stage is implicated in autism-spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. The definitive evidence for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in pruning has eluded researchers until now, but in research published in the...

New Model Synapse Could Help With Disorders Such As Epilepsy And Anxiety
2012-08-08 09:42:42

A new way to study the role of a critical neurotransmitter in disorders such as epilepsy, anxiety, insomnia, depression, schizophrenia, and alcohol addiction has been developed by a group of scientists led by Gong Chen, an associate professor of biology at Penn State University. The new method involves molecularly engineering a model synapse -- a structure through which a nerve cell sends signals to another cell. This model synapse can precisely control a variety of receptors for the...

Effects From Low-cal Diets Seen In Fly Brain And Mouthpart
2012-07-16 13:06:17

Transmission of nerve signals is enhanced in the insects that eat less A novel technique for measuring tiny, rapid-fire secretions in the brains and mouthparts of fruit flies (drosophila) is providing insights into the beneficial effects of eating less – information that ultimately could help people suffering from neuromuscular disorders. Using the method, researchers uncovered never-before-seen brain chemistry that helps explain why fruit flies genetically manipulated to mimic...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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