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Latest Chemotaxis Stories

a3003fc2fa187d8ac9a47e4a8b99bcb41
2009-09-25 05:49:58

Findings show that structure is the same throughout bacterial kingdom, and may provide insight into more complex signaling pathways Using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, a team led by researchers from Caltech has for the first time visualized and described the precise arrangement of chemoreceptors"”the receptors that sense and respond to chemical stimuli"”in bacteria. In addition, they have found that this specific architecture is the same throughout a wide...

5f2ad8366f3c6080b1a7b9977bf2da661
2009-07-29 12:50:00

The masterpieces that spring from the talents of Rembrandt, Van Gogh and other artists often begin with the creation of a gradient of colors on a palette. In a similar manner, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have created an innovative device called the "microfluidic palette" to produce multiple, steady-state chemical gradients"”gradual changes in concentration across an area"”in a miniature chamber about the diameter of a pinhead. The tool...

7c9e63633ce53bf156a97bb41eb63dd81
2009-07-08 13:40:00

Berkeley Lab scientists have shown how thousands of bacterial membrane proteins are able to assemble into clusters that direct cell movement to select chemicals in their environment.Self-assembling and self-organizing systems are the Holy Grails of nanotechnology, but nature has been producing such systems for millions of years. A team of scientists has taken a unique look at how thousands of bacterial membrane proteins are able to assemble into clusters that direct cell movement to select...

3ade76facd30019d0364a9fb5359d13b1
2008-10-29 11:38:21

Like something from a horror movie, the swarm of bacteria ripples purposefully toward their prey, devours it and moves on. Researchers at the University of Iowa are studying this behavior in Myxococcus xanthus (M. xanthus), a bacterium commonly found in soil, which preys on other bacteria. Despite its deadly role in the bacterial world, M. xanthus is harmless to humans and might one day be used beneficially to destroy harmful bacteria on surfaces or in human infections, said John Kirby,...

2008-03-27 09:34:35

A new method of filming blood-vessel cells that move in accordance with targeted signals has been developed by researchers at Uppsala University in collaboration with researchers at the University of California. The method can also be used to study how migration of cancer cells and nerves can be controlled. These interesting findings have now been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.Formation of new blood cells and lymph vessels takes place with a number of different diseases....

15d41ea18e8053147c3f8174856b09141
2007-03-28 16:11:42

A new Vanderbilt University study has identified a chemical signal that plays a critical role in forming the heart, which could lead to new strategies to combat congenital heart defects. In the initial stage of development, called gastrulation, the fertilized egg undergoes a marvelous and complex transformation from a ball of identical cells into an embryo with a distinct shape and a number of different cell types. During this transformation, cells move to specific locations where they begin...

2005-06-03 19:46:13

Scientists at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have constructed a computer simulation that allows them to study the relationship between biochemical fluctuations within a single cell and the cell's behavior as it interacts with other cells and its environment. The simulation, called AgentCell, has possible applications in cancer research, drug development and combating bioterrorism. Other simulations of biological systems are limited to the molecular level, the...


Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'