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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 1:20 EDT

Latest chest pain Stories

2009-10-25 07:36:58

The gender difference between men and women is a lot smaller than we've been led to believe when it comes to heart attack symptoms, according to a new study presented to the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress 2009, co-hosted by the Heart and Stroke Foundation and the Canadian Cardiovascular Society. "Both the media and some patient educational materials frequently suggest that women experience symptoms of a heart attack very differently from men," says cardiac nurse Martha Mackay, a Canadian...

2009-10-08 10:00:00

PALO ALTO, Calif., Oct. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- CardioDx, a cardiovascular genomic diagnostics company, announced today the appointment of Louis G. Lange, M.D., Ph.D., as Chairman of the company's Board of Directors. CardioDx recently launched Corus(TM) CAD, the first and only gene expression test to quantify the likelihood of obstructive(1) coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with stable chest pain. "Dr. Lange brings an ideal perspective to CardioDx as both a cardiologist and...

2009-09-29 13:30:00

HOUSTON, Sept. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- In its continuous pursuit of quality cardiac care, Houston Northwest Medical Center was proudly recognized as the first accredited chest pain center in Houston and one of a handful in Texas to be named a Cycle III Chest Pain Center with PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention). Cycle III accreditation is the highest accreditation possible for treatment of chest pain -- by the Society of Chest Pain Centers. The Society of Chest Pain Centers (SCPC) is...

2009-09-15 08:48:30

The world's largest quality of life study of chronic angina patients attending general practice clinics has revealed that almost one in three experience frequent chest pain, which affects their daily life. The collaborative project between the University of Adelaide and Servier Australia surveyed more than 2000 chronic angina patients throughout Australia and has been published today in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Lead author Associate Professor John Beltrame says the study showed that...

2009-08-31 09:47:58

New biomarkers significantly improve the early detection of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Recent studies reveal a novel and promising way for doctors to conclusively ensure that a patient is having or not having an AMI in a timely and accurate manner saving time and money. In the assessment of patients presenting with chest pain and suspected AMI doctors rely on detailed patient assessment, the ECG, and the measurement of cardiac troponins (specific markers for dying cells in the heart)....

2009-08-25 15:50:00

A new study from NYU School of Medicine found that women may have a slightly higher risk of death than men in the thirty days following an acute coronary syndrome (ACS), but that these differences appear to be attributable to factors such as severity and type of ACS. The study, published in the August 26, 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), found however that overall there was no significant difference in mortality observed between the sexes after a heart...

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2009-08-07 15:25:00

A new study finds that men who experience chest pain are much more likely than women to develop serious heart problems.The study, led by the National University of Ireland, showed that male patients with chest pain were twice as likely than female patients to have a heart attack, and nearly three times as likely to suffer a heart disease-related death.Chest pain, known as angina, is caused by an insufficient supply of blood to the heart muscle.  Although it can sometimes be the first...

2009-08-04 13:27:53

 Emergency physicians should trust their judgment when evaluating patients who report with chest pain symptoms, said a group of researchers led by Abhinav Chandra, M.D., at Duke University Medical Center.Their research suggests that emergency physicians should counsel with other physicians against discharge when they feel strongly about a patient for whom there is no compelling data, other than our evaluation and judgment, Chandra said."There is evidence for emergency room physicians to...

2009-07-10 12:38:03

Using cardiac CT scans on low risk chest pain patients can reduce costs and shorten the length of hospital stays, researchers in Seattle said. A cardiac CT, or computed tomography, is much less expensive and time consuming than the traditional standard of care workup comprising enzyme tests, nuclear stress testing and electrocardiograms, researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, said. Cardiac CT workups in low risk chest pain patients decreased the length of...

2009-07-09 10:43:36

The use of cardiac CT for low-risk chest pain patients in the emergency department, instead of the traditional standard of care (SOC) workup, may reduce a patient's length of stay and hospital charges, according to a study performed at the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. The SOC workup, which is timely and expensive, consists of a series of cardiac enzyme tests, ECGs and nuclear stress testing.Fifty patients were included in the study. "We found that cardiac CT based...