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Latest Chimpanzee genome project Stories

2014-01-08 17:11:35

A new study compares the relative rate of molecular evolution between humans and chimps with that of their lice. The researchers wanted to know whether evolution marches on at a steady pace in all creatures or if subtle changes in genes – substitutions of individual letters of the genetic code – occur more rapidly in some groups than in others. A report of the study appears in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The team chose its study subjects because humans, chimps and their...

Stem Cells Reveal Differences Humans Apes
2013-10-24 09:27:59

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online For the first time, scientists from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies have taken stem cells from chimpanzees and bonobos and turned them into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and their work has helped to highlight some of the differences between humans and non-human primates. This type of cell, which has the ability to form any other type of cell or tissue in the body, can be used to model diseases that would...

2013-04-18 21:58:39

Selection in European populations of genes regulated by FOXP2, a key factor in development and language Researchers have designed a method that can universally test for evolutionary adaption, or positive (Darwinian) selection, in any chosen set of genes, using re-sequencing data such as that generated by the 1000 Genomes Project. The method identifies gene sets that show evidence for positive selection in comparison with matched controls, and thus highlights genes for further functional...

2012-05-09 05:30:20

(Ivanhoe Newswire)– The human brain is the center of the human nervous system and has the same general structure as the brains of other mammals, but it´s than expected. According to a pair of studies, a partial, duplicate copy of a gene appears to be responsible for the critical features of the human brain that distinguish us from our closest primate kin. The momentous gene duplication event occurred about two or three million years ago, at a critical transition in the evolution...

2012-03-07 13:43:25

UCLA scientists identify 2,000 important genes Can the song of a small bird provide valuable insights into human stuttering and speech-related disorders and conditions, including autism and stroke? New research by UCLA life scientists and colleagues provides reason for optimism. The scientists discovered that some 2,000 genes in a region of the male zebra finch's brain known as "Area X" are significantly linked to singing. More than 1,500 genes in this region, a critical part of the...

X Factor Determined Chimpanzee Development
2012-01-31 04:36:24

Genetic mutations that boost an individual´s adaptability have greater chances of getting through to X chromosomes — at least in chimpanzees, according to new Danish research. One of the most important questions for evolution researchers is how a species develops and adapts during the course of time. An analysis of the genes of twelve chimpanzees has now demonstrated that the chimpanzee X chromosome plays a very special role in the animal´s development. The analysis was...

2011-12-28 08:10:14

An important part of saving a species is often understanding its DNA. Through a collaborative effort including 14 scientists representing organizations across Europe and the United States, researchers have been able to analyze the genome of the great ape species of the world. "A robust appreciation of the means and methods of the evolution of genomes which underlies the diversification of the great apes requires a more detailed knowledge of genome variation that is poorly revealed by...

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2011-03-10 06:05:00

Scientists have analyzed the genomes of humans and closely related primates and discovered over 500 regulatory regions that chimpanzees and mammals have that humans do not.  Gill Bejerano, a biologist at Stanford University School of Medicine, and colleagues found that humans lack the penile spines found in many other mammals, and also why specific regions of human brains are larger than those of our closest relatives. "Rather than looking for species-specific differences in specific...

2011-03-09 16:34:23

Humans are clearly different from chimpanzees. The question is, why? According to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, it may boil down in part to what we don't have, rather than what we do. The loss of snippets of regulatory DNA, the scientists found, could be the reason why, for example, humans lack the penile spines found in many other mammals, and also why specific regions of our brains are larger than those of our closest relatives. Understanding these and other...

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2010-04-29 14:55:11

Jumping Elements, Some of Which Cause Genetic Diseases, Become Incorporated in the Genome at Different Stages of Human Development The density of transposable (jumping) elements between sex chromosomes in primates may have important consequences for the studies of human genetic diseases, say Penn State University researchers.  Erika Kvikstad, a 2009 Penn State Ph.D. graduate in genetics, and Kateryna Makova, an associate professor of biology at Penn State, used a statistical regression...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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