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Latest Chinook salmon Stories

2008-07-13 15:00:16

By Margaret Bauman, Alaska Journal of Commerce, Anchorage Jul. 13--Sockeye salmon returning to Bristol Bay are running a little late this year, but you'd never know it from the glut of reds now overwhelming processors in Bristol Bay. Harvesters, who were initially getting a reported 60 cents to 70 cents a pound, were livid and complaining to the office of Gov. Sarah Palin. Fishermen had requested before the season began that the state allow additional processors into Bristol Bay, but the...

2008-07-10 12:00:38

By Warren Cornwall, Seattle Times Jul. 10--Indian tribes, trying to protect imperiled White River salmon, and Eastside cities, thirsty for water, have reached a deal that removes a major roadblock to the cities' quest to pipe water from Lake Tapps. The agreement, announced Wednesday, would ensure more water stays in the White River than in earlier decades. In the past, parts of the river nearly ran dry, as most of the water was diverted to Lake Tapps and a hydropower dam. "It means...

2008-07-10 09:00:42

By Eric Sharp, Detroit Free Press Jul. 10--SAULT STE. MARIE, Ontario -- Ted Williams, one of the greatest baseball players of all time, was also one of the world's best light-tackle anglers. And his picks for the top light-tackle fish were the tarpon, bonefish and Atlantic salmon. You'd have to travel 1,000 miles and spend a chunk of money to catch the first two. But for the next month or so, a tank of gasoline will take Michigan anglers to one of the best places in the world to tangle...

2008-07-04 21:00:12

By ALLEN THOMAS Conflict swirls constantly around Columbia River salmon management. It's as much a part of the river as the tides and eddies of the stream itself. One group is chafed about the fisheries of another incessantly. So who's upset with who right now: Both the Columbia treaty tribes and the non-Indian lower river gillnetters are irked at the Washington and Oregon fishery agencies about the summer chinook season. Sport fishermen between Tongue Point near Astoria and...

2008-07-03 18:00:17

By Matt Weiser, The Sacramento Bee, Calif. Jul. 3--Salmon fishing closures on Central Valley rivers took effect today to protect what's left of the fall-run chinook population. No chinook may be kept anywhere on the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers or any of their tributaries, including the American and Feather rivers. The only exception is from Nov. 1 to Dec. 31 on the Sacramento River between the Red Bluff Diversion Dam and Knights Landing. Anglers may possess only one salmon at a...

2008-07-03 15:00:21

By Allen Thomas, The Columbian, Vancouver, Wash. Jul. 3--Conflict swirls constantly around Columbia River salmon management. It's as much a part of the river as the tides and eddies of the stream itself. One group is chafed about the fisheries of another incessantly. So who's upset with who right now: Both the Columbia treaty tribes and the non-Indian lower river gillnetters are irked at the Washington and Oregon fishery agencies over the summer chinook season. Sport fishermen between...

2008-07-03 00:00:12

By Dave DeSimone Pairing grilled wild Pacific salmon's succulent, rich flavors and firm, smoky texture with wine and beer creates intriguing possibilities. Aromatic, rich white wines, fruity, elegant red wines and robust, hop-laden ales match equally well with this delicious delicacy. But before choosing libations, deft retail navigating is essential to netting the best blend of quality and value for the wild salmon itself. "Not all wild caught salmon is the same," says Devenee...

2008-07-01 18:00:13

A DEAL to safeguard the future of the last lave net fishery in Wales has been agreed between the fishermen and Environment Agency Wales. A lease will for malise existing arrangements and protect ancient tradition of the Black Rock lave net fishermen while also protecting salmon stocks. The fishermen at Black Rock, who all come from the nearby villages of Sud brook, Portske wett and Caldicot, use triangular nets to fish a particular stretch of the Severn Estuary at Black Rock using...

2008-06-27 21:02:20

By ERIK ROBINSON A sea lion hitches a ride aboard a barge transiting the lock at Bonneville Dam earlier this year. Observers with the Army Corps of Engineers estimate sea lions devoured about 2.8 percent of this year's spring salmon migration. Sea lions consumed a smaller proportion of the spring salmon run at Bonneville Dam this year, but federal authorities figure human intervention had little to do with it. The pinnipeds have in recent years congregated 145 miles up the Columbia...

2008-06-27 15:02:32

By Erik Robinson, The Columbian, Vancouver, Wash. Jun. 27--Sea lions consumed a smaller proportion of the spring salmon run at Bonneville Dam this year, but federal authorities figure human intervention had little to do with it. The pinnipeds have in recent years congregated 145 miles up the Columbia River, where they can target spring salmon at the man-made bottleneck created by Bonneville. State fisheries managers aborted a trap-and-relocate proposal early last month, after six dead...


Latest Chinook salmon Reference Libraries

30_d72bbfcb7b72cb4d37d9cbb502906f5d
2005-06-02 08:18:08

Salmon is the common name for several species of fish of the Salmonidae family "“ although several other fishes in the family are called trout. Salmon live in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Salmon are anadromous: they are born in fresh water, migrate to the ocean, then return to fresh water to reproduce. Folklore has it that the fish return to the exact spot where they were born to spawn and modern research shows that usually at least 90% of the fish spawning in a stream were born...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'