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Latest Chinook salmon Stories

2008-07-30 09:00:45

By James Janega, Chicago Tribune Jul. 30--OFF ATWATER BEACH, Wis. -- OFF ATWATER BEACH, Wis. -- This place should be an underwater desert. But as the three researchers wearing scuba tanks and lead weights drop through the water, the landscape of rounded stones 30 feet below is disturbingly full of strange, new life. In just a few years, the gravel and white boulders that for centuries covered the bottom of Lake Michigan between Chicago and the Door County, Wis., peninsula have...

2008-07-30 00:00:25

SEATTLE _ The U.S. Navy can keep setting off underwater explosions in Puget Sound without posing a serious threat to protected salmon, steelhead and orcas, a federal wildlife agency has concluded. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) determined that dozens of naval exercises involving explosive charges up to 20 pounds could kill thousands of salmon. But the agency also said it wouldn't make a significant dent in the overall fish populations and the Navy had taken steps to minimize...

2008-07-28 09:00:55

By Scott Sandsberry YAKIMA --Anglers will have the 31 days of August plus Labor Day - - compared to just 12 days last year -- in the popular "Buoy 10" fall chinook fishery near the mouth of the Columbia River, but won't be as fortunate upriver. They'll have to release any chinook they catch upriver to the Bonneville Dam until Sept. 1, and retention of adult chinook will be limited in many of the mid-Columbia tributaries popular with Central Washington fishermen. For the first time,...

2008-07-24 18:00:35

By Scott Learn, The Oregonian, Portland, Ore. Jul. 24--One of the great fish surprises in years has landed in the Northwest: Sockeye salmon, an ocean-going species that starts and ends its life hundreds of river miles inland, have swum their way up the Columbia River this summer in numbers unseen in five decades. No one knows exactly why. Some say it's because federal courts ordered the release of extra water over dams in 2006 and 2007 to make passage easier when the fish were young...

2008-07-24 12:00:41

By John Ellis, The Fresno Bee, Calif. Jul. 24--Attorneys representing state and federal water projects said Wednesday that they could prove the massive system of pumps, dams and canals isn't harming three threatened fish species. U.S. District Judge Oliver W. Wanger gave them until Aug. 29 to submit reports showing that's true. Wednesday's action was the latest in a long-running fight between environmental groups and the state and federal governments over the projects' effect on...

2008-07-23 21:00:26

By ERIK ROBINSON Anglers line the north bank of the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam to fish for shad in June. A new scientific report recommends policymakers pay more attention to the harm caused to native plants and animals by invaders such as shad, an East Coast native that now forms the single largest mass of fish in the lower Columbia River. Shad, native to the East Coast, were brought west in the 1870s. Most Columbia River anglers have no reason to know the name Seth Green....

2008-07-23 15:00:50

By Erik Robinson, The Columbian, Vancouver, Wash. Jul. 23--Most Columbia River anglers have no reason to know the name Seth Green. Yet today's Columbia River fish population would be dramatically different were it not for Green's decision in 1871 to hop a westbound train in Albany, N.Y. An early fish culturist, Green was on a mission to seed the Sacramento River with juvenile shad native to the East Coast. Responding to a request from state fish commissioners in California, Green headed...

2008-07-19 00:00:21

By John Ellis, The Fresno Bee, Calif. Jul. 18--A federal judge on Friday ruled that three fish species -- driven by drought conditions in the state -- are not recovering and are at risk of extinction. At the same time, according to the 118-page ruling by U.S. District Judge Oliver W. Wanger in Fresno, operators of the state and federal water projects did not prove during a recent series of hearings that their combined operations are not jeopardizing the habitat, survival and recovery of...

2008-07-13 15:00:16

By Margaret Bauman, Alaska Journal of Commerce, Anchorage Jul. 13--Sockeye salmon returning to Bristol Bay are running a little late this year, but you'd never know it from the glut of reds now overwhelming processors in Bristol Bay. Harvesters, who were initially getting a reported 60 cents to 70 cents a pound, were livid and complaining to the office of Gov. Sarah Palin. Fishermen had requested before the season began that the state allow additional processors into Bristol Bay, but the...

2008-07-10 12:00:38

By Warren Cornwall, Seattle Times Jul. 10--Indian tribes, trying to protect imperiled White River salmon, and Eastside cities, thirsty for water, have reached a deal that removes a major roadblock to the cities' quest to pipe water from Lake Tapps. The agreement, announced Wednesday, would ensure more water stays in the White River than in earlier decades. In the past, parts of the river nearly ran dry, as most of the water was diverted to Lake Tapps and a hydropower dam. "It means...


Latest Chinook salmon Reference Libraries

30_d72bbfcb7b72cb4d37d9cbb502906f5d
2005-06-02 08:18:08

Salmon is the common name for several species of fish of the Salmonidae family "“ although several other fishes in the family are called trout. Salmon live in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Salmon are anadromous: they are born in fresh water, migrate to the ocean, then return to fresh water to reproduce. Folklore has it that the fish return to the exact spot where they were born to spawn and modern research shows that usually at least 90% of the fish spawning in a stream were born...

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