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Latest Chromosome Stories

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2010-07-02 07:51:22

Although clubfoot is one of the most common congenital birth defects, few genetic causes have been found. Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found what they believe to be the most common cause of inherited clubfoot yet discovered. By performing a routine genetic screening on 66 patients with an inherited form of clubfoot, Christina Gurnett, MD, PhD, a Washington University pediatric geneticist and neurologist at St. Louis Children's Hospital, and...

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2010-06-25 10:19:58

Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, and the Max-Planck Institute of Immunobiology Freiburg have identified a novel protein complex that regulates around 4000 genes in the fruit fly Drosophila and likely plays an important role in mammals, too. Published today in Molecular Cell, their findings explain how another regulatory protein can lead a double life. "This new complex seems to be one of the major regulatory complexes both in Drosophila...

2010-06-18 14:56:41

Y chromosome linked to fatal aneurysm Research currently being undertaken at the University of Leicester may identify reasons underlying an increased risk of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) in men. In her doctoral study, Cardiovascular Sciences student Lisa Bloomer is looking into the causes of the male predominance of AAA, with a particular emphasis on genetic basis of the disease. Preliminary results from the study will be showcased at the University of Leicester's Festival of Postgraduate...

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2010-06-11 07:03:10

Nuclear pores are the primary gatekeepers mediating communication between a cell's nucleus and its cytoplasm. Recently these large multiprotein transport channels have also been shown to play an essential role in developmental gene regulation. Despite the critical role in nuclear function, however, nuclear pore complexes remain somewhat shadowy figures, with many details about their formation shrouded in mystery. Now a team of investigators from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has...

2010-06-01 18:58:27

Many tumor cells would not be viable due to aberrant chromosome distribution if they had not developed a special trick. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center have investigated which genes are responsible for this survival strategy of cancer cells. The revealed that cancer cells rely on the tension of specific protein fibers to be able to multiply. Thus, proteins which maintain this tension are promising targets for new, target-specific anticancer drugs: If they are switched off,...

2010-05-14 10:16:25

Whitehead Institute researchers have determined a key part of how cells regulate the chromosome/microtubule interface, which is central to proper chromosomal distribution during cell division. "This is the surveillance machinery that makes sure that the chromosomes are divided correctly between cells," says Whitehead Member Iain Cheeseman. The findings are published in this week's issue of Molecular Cell. During cell division, the cell's DNA is consolidated into X-shaped chromosome pairs that...

2010-05-14 10:00:12

Oxygen levels in the lab can permanently alter human embryonic stem (ES) cells, specifically inducing X chromosome inactivation in female cells, according to Whitehead Institute researchers. Human ES cells have been routinely created and maintained at atmospheric levels of oxygen, which is about 20%. Cells in the body are usually exposed to only 1-9% oxygen. "When human ES cells are isolated at 20% oxygen, they are stressed and they inactivate one X chromosome in female cells," says Founding...

2010-05-13 13:25:15

Research sheds light on prenatal heart formation, chromosome 22q.11 deletion syndrome Researchers studying the common genetic disorder chromosome 22q.11 deletion syndrome have identified key proteins that act together to regulate early embryonic development. One protein is essential to life; in animal studies, embryos without the protein do not survive past the first few days of gestation. Although the findings do not currently affect treatments for chromosome 22q.11 deletion syndrome, they...

2010-05-13 08:46:00

--Research Sheds Light on Prenatal Heart Formation, Chromosome 22q.11 Deletion Syndrome-- PHILADELPHIA, May 13 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Researchers studying the common genetic disorder chromosome 22q.11 deletion syndrome have identified key proteins that act together to regulate early embryonic development. One protein is essential to life; in animal studies, embryos without the protein do not survive past the first few days of gestation. Although the findings do not currently affect...

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2010-05-07 08:59:35

Proteins called cohesins ensure that newly copied chromosomes bind together, separate correctly during cell division, and are repaired efficiently after DNA damage. Scientists at the Carnegie Institution have found for the first time that cohesins are needed in different concentrations for their different functions. This discovery helps to explain how certain developmental disorders, such as Cornelia de Lange and Roberts Syndrome arise without affecting cell division essential to development....


Word of the Day
ramage
  • Boughs or branches.
  • Warbling of birds in trees.
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