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Latest Chromosome Stories

2009-09-17 09:17:52

A Florida State University scientist says he's found the cause of chromosomal birth defects, such as Down, XYY, Edwards, Patau and Turner's syndromes. Using yeast genetics, Assistant Professor Hong-Guo Yu and colleagues selectively removed a single protein from the cell division process called meiosis and found that when the protein known as Pds5 is missing, chromosomes fail to segregate and pair up properly, and birth defects can result. Researchers said the study shines new light on the...

2009-09-16 15:04:06

Using yeast genetics and a novel scheme to selectively remove a single protein from the cell division process called meiosis, a cell biologist at The Florida State University found that when a key molecular player known as Pds5 goes missing, chromosomes fail to segregate and pair up properly, and birth defects such as Down syndrome can result. That discovery is groundbreaking, but so, too, is what principal investigator Hong-Guo Yu calls the "genetics trick" performed by his research team...

2009-09-14 15:41:39

New insights gained into how polyploidy and genomic change can lead to evolutionary change and plants' fitness and vigor An individual with Down syndrome and a male calico cat have one thing in common"”each has an extra chromosome. For animals, most instances of an extra chromosome result in birth defects or even death, but plants are another matter entirely. Many plants are able to survive the presence of an extra copy of their entire genome (known as polyploidy) and are often even...

2009-09-10 10:33:26

New study proves that communication between male and female occurs in our innermost beings In the week that the University of Leicester celebrates the 25th anniversary of the discovery of DNA fingerprinting (Thursday September 10) new findings from the world-renowned University of Leicester Department of Genetics reveal for the first time that the male and female do truly communicate "“at least at the fundamental genetic level. The research counters scientific theory that the X and Y...

2009-09-03 15:25:35

The unique mechanism behind the evolutionary survival of the human Y chromosome may also be responsible for a range of sex disorders, from failed sperm production to sex reversal to Turner Syndrome. Roughly six years ago, David Page's lab at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research reported the discovery of eight large areas of mirror-imaged genetic sequences, or palindromes, along the Y chromosome. Because the Y chromosome essentially has no partner with which to swap genes, a process...

2009-09-02 14:37:17

U.S. and Mexican scientists say they've identified genetic variants on a specific chromosome that are associated with childhood asthma occurring in Mexicans. The scientists from the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health, the Mexican National Institute of Public Health and their U.S. and U.K. colleagues found genetic variants in a region on chromosome 9q might influence asthma development in Mexican children. The scientists conducted a genome-wide association study, in which they...

2009-08-27 22:26:00

WOBURN, Mass., Aug. 27 /PRNewswire/ -- U.S. researchers using CRi's Oosight(TM) imaging system have developed a gene transfer technique that has potential to prevent inherited diseases passed on from mothers to their children through mutated DNA in cell mitochondria. The research, which demonstrated the technique in rhesus monkeys, appears in the Aug. 26 issue of the journal Nature. The group, headed by Dr. Shoukhrat Mitalipov of the Oregon National Primate Research Center and the Oregon...

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2009-08-24 08:21:19

Mitotic release of chromatin-binding RNA gives insight into X chromosome silencing Early in development, mammalian female cells counteract their double dose of X chromosomes by coating one of them with a large RNA named XIST. The RNA binds to the same X chromosome from which it is transcribed and initiates a series of events leading to the chromosome's permanent silencing. In the August 24, 2009 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology, Hall et al. exploit the fact that XIST temporarily...

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2009-08-17 16:25:00

"A biologist, a physicist, and a nanotechnologist walk into a ..." sounds like the start of a joke. Instead, it was the start of a collaboration that has helped to decipher a critical, but so far largely unstudied, phase of how cells divide. Errors in cell division can cause mutations that lead to cancer, and this study could shed light on the role of chromosome abnormalities in uncontrolled cell replication.The biologist in question is University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine Associate...

2009-08-17 09:24:38

Parents of healthy newborns often remark on the miracle of life. The joining of egg and sperm to create such delightful creatures can seem dazzlingly beautiful if the chromosome information from each parent has been translated properly into the embryo and newborn.The darker side is that when extra copies of chromosomes or fewer than the normal 46 (23 from each parent) are present, tragic birth defects can occur. Now, scientists at the University of Georgia have developed a model system for...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.