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Latest Chromosomes Stories

2012-01-16 11:01:24

Telomeres, the very ends of chromosomes, become shorter as we age. When a cell divides it first duplicates its DNA and, because the DNA replication machinery fails to get all the way to the end, with each successive cell division a little bit more is missed. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Arthritis Research & Therapy shows that cells from osteoarthritic knees have abnormally shortened telomeres and that the percentage of cells with ultra short telomeres...

Longer Telomeres Mean Longer Lifespan
2012-01-11 05:57:06

A new study has found a possible predictor of lifespan. According to researchers at the University of Glasgow in England, the link lies in the telomeres that are located on an individual´s DNA. Telomeres are pieces of DNA that are located on the ends of chromosomal strands. They serve the same purpose as aglets on the ends of shoelaces, keeping the chromosome intact and preventing it from losing viable information over the course of a person´s lifetime. According to professor...

2011-12-12 16:15:22

Scientists show how cells accurately inherit information that is not contained in their genes All 10 trillion cells in the adult human body are genetically identical, but develop into distinct cell types, such as muscle cells, skin cells or neurons, by activating some genes while inhibiting others. Remarkably, each specialized cell maintains a memory of their individual identity by remembering which genes should be kept on or off, even when making copies of themselves. This type of memory...

2011-11-14 11:32:32

A cell's genome maintains its integrity by organizing some of its regions into a super-compressed form of DNA called heterochromatin. In the comparatively simple organism fission yeast, a cellular phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi) plays an essential role in assembling heterochromatin, which keeps the compressed DNA in an inactive or "silent" state. Central to this process is a large protein complex that physically anchors various molecules involved in heterochromatin assembly to the...

2011-11-09 08:00:00

The Agricultural Sciences Network Life-Sciences.net features the latest scientific publications in this discipline. The most recently featured articles deal with characterization of a wild relative of rice and biocontrol of black scurf on potato. (PRWEB) November 09, 2011 The Agricultural Sciences category of the Life-Sciences Magazine covers the cultivation and production of crops, raising of livestock, and postharvest processing of natural products. This section currently contains more...

2011-11-04 22:57:59

The histone protein CenH3 is both necessary and sufficient to trigger the formation of centromeres and pass them on from 1 generation to the next Centromeres are specialised regions of the genome, which can be identified under the microscope as the primary constriction in X-shaped chromosomes. The cell skeleton, which distributes the chromosomes to the two daughter cells during cell division, attaches to the centromeres. In most organisms the position of the centromere is not determined by...

2011-11-04 21:25:09

Scientists of the German Cancer Research Center have discovered an alternative mechanism for the extension of the telomere repeat sequence by DNA repair enzymes. The ends of the chromosomes, the telomeres, are repetitive DNA sequences that shorten every time a cell divides during the process of duplicating its genome. Once the telomeres become very short the cell stops dividing. Thus, telomeres work like a cellular clock that keeps an eye on the number of cell divisions. And once the...

Flies And Mice Help Scientists Get To The Heart Of Down Syndrome
2011-11-04 10:19:17

[ Watch the Video ] A novel study involving fruit flies and mice has allowed biologists to identify two critical genes responsible for congenital heart defects in individuals with Down syndrome, a major cause of infant mortality and death in people born with this genetic disorder. In a paper published in the November 3 issue of the open access journal PLoS Genetics, researchers from UC San Diego, the Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., and the University of...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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