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Latest Chrysomelidae Stories

How Western Corn Rootworm Resists Crop Rotation
2012-07-19 08:40:51

A new study answers a question that has baffled researchers for more than 15 years: How does the western corn rootworm — an insect that thrives on corn but dies on soybeans — persist in fields that alternate between corn and soybeans? The answer, researchers say, has to do with enzyme production in the rootworm gut. Their findings are described in a paper in Ecology and Evolution. Crop rotation declined in the middle of the 20th century as the use of insecticides and...

More Acreage Needed To Slow Pest Resistance To Biotech Corn
2012-06-05 09:29:21

To slow resistance of western corn rootworm beetles to genetically protected crops, much larger 'refuge' acreages of conventional crops have to be planted, 2 experts warn in a paper published in the Journal of Economic Ecology Genetically modified crops that produce insect-killing proteins from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) have reduced reliance on insecticide sprays since 1996. These proteins are lethal to some devastating crop pests, but do not harm most other creatures...

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2012-03-12 10:26:26

The corn rootworm -- one of the most economically destructive insects of maize in the United States -- is threatening to become agriculture´s worst nightmare as biotech corn is continually losing its resistance to the damaging pests. The problem is so severe that a group of scientists wrote a letter to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) warning that action needs to be taken to rid agriculture of the devastating insects. The problem was first made aware of last year, when...

2011-03-03 12:23:14

Simply by eating the leaves of an invasive tree that soaks up river water, an Asian beetle may help to slow down water loss in the Southwestern United States. Two scientists from UC Santa Barbara, working with colleagues from the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have published the first substantive data showing water savings that can result from using Asian beetles for the biological control of tamarisk, an invasive tree of western rivers. The study is now...

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2011-01-18 14:33:51

Only five species of these so-called 'flea' beetles, out of a global total of 60, had been found to date in New Caledonia, in the western Pacific. A three-year study has now enabled Spanish researchers to discover two new herbivorous beetles "“ Arsipoda geographica and Arsipoda rostrata. These new beetles hold a secret "“ they feed on plants that the scientists have still not found on the archipelago. "The study, financed by the National Geographic, went some way beyond merely...

2010-12-01 13:21:43

One of the worst pests of corn in the world, the corn rootworm, may owe its worldwide success partly to its larvae's nasty, sticky blood. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist Jonathan G. Lundgren and his colleagues discovered this recently, working with CABI researchers in Del©mont, Switzerland, and H³dmezÃ…℠vásárhely, Hungary. The discovery could lead to development of ways to overcome these defenses as part of sustainable, ecologically...

2010-11-24 11:25:00

The search is on for insects, mites, microbes or nematodes that could be used in a biologically based approach to controlling silverleaf nightshade, an invasive weed from the Americas that has spread to southern Europe, Africa, India, Australia and elsewhere. According to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist Walker Jones, the perennial weed, Solanum elaeagnifolium, is being targeted for its ability to outcompete native plants, reduce crop yields and diminish pasture...


Latest Chrysomelidae Reference Libraries

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2005-09-12 10:10:06

The Scarlet Lily Beetle (Lilioceris lilii) is native to Europe but is now widely found in North America. Larvae damage cultivated lily and Fritillaria plants. Photo by Keith Edkins The beetle family Chrysomelidae, or leaf beetles is a family of over 35,000 species in more than 2,500 genera. Leaf beetles are recognizable by their tarsal formula and distinguished from long-horned beetles (family Cerambycidae) by their short, filiform antennae. Adult and larval leaf beetles feed on all...

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2005-09-09 07:49:22

PHOTO CAPTION: The common asparagus beetle Crioceris asparagi is an important pest of asparagus crops. Photo by Keith Edkins 2003 The Common Asparagus Beetle (Crioceris asparagi) is an chief pest of Asparagus crops both in Europe and in North America; asparagus is its only food plant. The adult beetles and the larvae strip the needle-like leaves off the asparagus fronds which deprives the plants of the ability to build food reserves for future years. They also damage the shoots, thereby...

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2005-09-08 11:11:08

PHOTO CAPTION: Goliath Beetle Beetles are one of the main groups of insects. Their order, Coleoptera (meaning "sheathed wing"), has more species than any other order in the entire animal kingdom. Forty percent of all described insect species are beetles (about 350,000 species), and new species are regularly discovered. Estimates put the total number of species at between 5 and 8 million. When J. B. S. Haldane, a British geneticist, was asked what his studies of nature revealed about...

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2005-07-14 11:29:50

The beetle family Chrysomelidae, or leaf beetles, is a family of over 35,000 species in more than 2,500 genera. Leaf beetles are recognizable by their tarsal formula and distinguished from long-horned beetles (family Cerambycidae) by their short, filiform antennae. Adult and larval leaf beetles feed on all sorts of plant tissue. Many are economically important pests of agriculture, for example the colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), the asparagus beetle (Crioceris...

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Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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