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Latest Chrysomelidae Stories

2009-08-10 12:26:56

A leaf-eating Chinese beetle is the newest ally in the fight to rid Colorado of an invasive weed threatening native life, a state agriculture official says. Dan Bean, the Colorado Department of Agriculture's director of biological pest control, said 100,000 yellow-striped Diorhabda beetles have already been released along the Arkansas River to help contain the spread of a voracious weed called tamarisk, The Denver Post said Monday. We want them to feed like crazy, Bean said of the beetles. An...

2009-08-03 16:22:04

Volunteer corn -- unwanted plants from a previous year's harvest -- can provide a safe harbor for pests from insecticides, U.S. researchers reported Monday. Less insecticide is squeezed out by the volunteer plants than from new plants, basically exposing western corn rootworm larvae to non-threatening doses, Purdue University researchers said in a news release. Now they're exposed to a sub-lethal source of (insecticide) Bt that didn't exist before, Christian Krupke, an assistant professor of...

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2009-08-03 19:35:00

A longstanding and fruitful collaboration between researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology and the University of Neuchâtel in Switzerland, together with contributions from colleagues in Munich and the US, has produced another first: the successful manipulation of a crop plant to emit a signal that attracts beneficial organisms. Genetic transformation of maize plants resulted in the release of the naturally active substance (E)-beta-caryophyllene from...

2009-05-07 16:11:00

WILMINGTON, Del., May 7 /PRNewswire/ -- A Scientific Advisory Panel (SAP) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a report today on the Optimum(R) AcreMax(TM) 1 insect protection system that supported the first-ever corn rootworm integrated refuge in the bag. A SAP review is one step in the EPA regulatory approval process. The SAP report is advisory in nature, focuses on specific technical questions posed to the panel by the EPA and does not represent a regulatory decision....

2009-04-01 00:00:00

INDIANAPOLIS, and BASEL, Switzerland, April 1 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Syngenta and Dow AgroSciences, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Company, today announced an agreement to cross license their respective corn traits for commercialization within their branded seed businesses. The agreement will allow both companies to maximize the value of their technologies and to bring greater choice and flexibility to growers. Under the terms of the agreement, Syngenta will receive global...

2009-02-27 13:30:00

Results Show Effective, Consistent Insect Control INDIANAPOLIS, Feb. 27 /PRNewswire/ -- Two years of pre-registration field trials conducted by Dow AgroSciences demonstrate the broad-spectrum insect control of SmartStax(TM) seed corn trait, a revolutionary new trait combination that is expected to be available in elite hybrids for 2010 planting. SmartStax is the first trait package to provide multiple modes of action for above- and below-ground pest control by combining the two leading...

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2008-12-16 16:13:27

Climate change could provide the warmer weather pests prefer, leading to an increase in populations that feed on corn and other crops, according to a new study. Warmer growing season temperatures and milder winters could allow some of these insects to expand their territory and produce an extra generation of offspring each year, said Noah Diffenbaugh, the Purdue University associate professor of earth and atmospheric sciences who led the study. "Our projections showed all of the species...

2008-08-04 09:00:31

By Dan England, Greeley Tribune, Colo. Aug. 4--Tina Booton keeps a tamarisk tree near her cubicle in the Weld County Public Works Department. Someone with a sick sense of humor could say it was pulled from the ground and displayed as an example to show what happens when you mess with Weld County's weed dictatorship. The tamarisk, after all, is as noxious as they come, a plant that's invaded Grand Junction and other parts of the Western Slope and continues to annoy Weld weeders, too....

2008-07-19 12:00:00

By Chris Woodka, The Pueblo Chieftain, Colo. Jul. 19--The Arkansas River basin has the greatest tamarisk infestation of any basin in the state, but has so far received relatively meager state and federal funding to combat the problem. The Southeastern Colorado Water Conservancy District wants to change that by developing the Arkansas Watershed Invasive Plant Plan, an approach that looks at the entire basin, not just spotty projects to remove tamarisk. "The Colorado River basin has 8...

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2008-03-11 11:10:00

The strongest creature in the world, the Hercules Beetle, has a color-changing trick that scientists have long sought to understand. Research published today, Tuesday, 11 March, in the New Journal of Physics, details an investigation into the structure of the specie's peculiar protective shell which could aid design of "Ëœintelligent materials'.The Hercules Beetle is remarkable, not only for its strength, able to carry up to 850 times its own weight, the protective outgrowth of the...


Latest Chrysomelidae Reference Libraries

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2005-09-12 10:10:06

The Scarlet Lily Beetle (Lilioceris lilii) is native to Europe but is now widely found in North America. Larvae damage cultivated lily and Fritillaria plants. Photo by Keith Edkins The beetle family Chrysomelidae, or leaf beetles is a family of over 35,000 species in more than 2,500 genera. Leaf beetles are recognizable by their tarsal formula and distinguished from long-horned beetles (family Cerambycidae) by their short, filiform antennae. Adult and larval leaf beetles feed on all...

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2005-09-09 07:49:22

PHOTO CAPTION: The common asparagus beetle Crioceris asparagi is an important pest of asparagus crops. Photo by Keith Edkins 2003 The Common Asparagus Beetle (Crioceris asparagi) is an chief pest of Asparagus crops both in Europe and in North America; asparagus is its only food plant. The adult beetles and the larvae strip the needle-like leaves off the asparagus fronds which deprives the plants of the ability to build food reserves for future years. They also damage the shoots, thereby...

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2005-09-08 11:11:08

PHOTO CAPTION: Goliath Beetle Beetles are one of the main groups of insects. Their order, Coleoptera (meaning "sheathed wing"), has more species than any other order in the entire animal kingdom. Forty percent of all described insect species are beetles (about 350,000 species), and new species are regularly discovered. Estimates put the total number of species at between 5 and 8 million. When J. B. S. Haldane, a British geneticist, was asked what his studies of nature revealed about...

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2005-07-14 11:29:50

The beetle family Chrysomelidae, or leaf beetles, is a family of over 35,000 species in more than 2,500 genera. Leaf beetles are recognizable by their tarsal formula and distinguished from long-horned beetles (family Cerambycidae) by their short, filiform antennae. Adult and larval leaf beetles feed on all sorts of plant tissue. Many are economically important pests of agriculture, for example the colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), the asparagus beetle (Crioceris...

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Word of the Day
maffling
  • To stammer.
  • Present participle of maffle, to stammer.
  • A simpleton.
The word 'maffle' may come from a Dutch word meaning 'to move the jaws' or a French word meaning 'having large cheeks'.