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Latest Chytridiomycosis Stories

2014-01-29 23:00:36

This frog species, which once hopped throughout California’s upper elevations, has dropped significantly in numbers, more than ninety percent in the past decade, due in part to chytrid, a skin fungus that thickens the frog’s skin so they can’t breathe. Oakland, CA (PRWEB) January 29, 2014 On Wednesday, February 5, 2014, from 6:30pm – 9:30pm, the public is invited to attend a Conservation Speaker Series focused on saving the mountain yellow- legged frog. This frog species, which...

New Study Raises Hope To Fight Chytrid Amphibian Pathogen
2014-01-21 15:47:48

Helmholtz-Center for Environmental Research An international team of researchers has made important progress in understanding the distribution of the deadly amphibian chytrid pathogen. In some regions, the deadly impact of the pathogen appears to be hampered by small predators, naturally occurring in freshwater bodies. These micropredators may efficiently reduce the number of free-swimming infectious stages (zoospores) by consuming them. This natural behavior will reduce the infection...

Deadly Fungus Cause Of Frog Declines In The Andes
2013-12-13 07:25:23

San Francisco State University Amphibians at high elevations can tolerate temperature changes, but susceptible to deadly fungus A deadly fungus, and not climate change as is widely believed, is the primary culprit behind the rapid decline of frog populations in the Andes mountains, according to a new study published today in the journal Conservation Biology. Frogs living at higher elevations can tolerate increasing temperatures, researchers found, but their habitats fall within the...

2013-10-24 11:57:40

The herbicide atrazine increased mortality from chytridiomycosis, a disease causing worldwide amphibian declines The combination of the herbicide atrazine and a fungal disease is particularly deadly to frogs, shows new research from a University of South Florida laboratory, which has been investigating the global demise of amphibian populations. USF Biologist Jason Rohr said the new findings show that early-life exposure to atrazine increases frog mortality but only when the frogs were...

Fatal Frog Fungus Releases Toxicity That Disables Immune Response
2013-10-18 09:09:21

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online For the last 40 years, amphibian species around the world have been dying out. A type of chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, was identified in 1998 as causing skin infections in frogs. Since then, it has become recognized as a leading contributor to worldwide amphibian decline. A new study from Vanderbilt University, published in the journal Science, reports that the fungus is killing these animals by releasing a toxic...

Salamanders Threatened By Deadly Skin-eating Fungus
2013-09-03 07:59:33

Imperial College London A new species of fungus that eats amphibians' skin has ravaged the fire salamander population in the Netherlands, bringing it close to regional extinction. Fire salamanders, recognizable by their distinctive yellow and black skin patterns, have been found dead in the country's forests since 2010. The population has fallen to around 10 individuals, less than four per cent of its original level, but what has been killing them has been a mystery until now....

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2012-08-13 07:55:35

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Climate change could cause parasites such as tapeworms to become more infectious or malignant, researchers from Oakland University and the University of South Florida claim in a new study gauging the impact of temperature swings on frogs' fungal infection rates. The research, which was published in Monday's edition of the journal Nature Climate Change, shows that tiny parasitic organisms likely have an easier time adapting to...

London Zoo Mountain Chicken Frogs Make Comeback
2012-07-30 05:46:27

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Critically endangered frogs rescued from possible extinction at the hands of a deadly fungus have successfully bred for the first time at the London Zoo, various media outlets reported Sunday. According to Telegraph Science Correspondent Richard Gray, the mountain chicken frogs had been rescued from the island of Montserrat, where they had been threatened by the spread of the Chytrid fungus. Chytridiomycosis, a disease associated...

2012-06-21 01:56:45

A Yale graduate student has developed a novel means for charting the history of a pathogen deadly to amphibians worldwide. Katy Richards-Hrdlicka, a doctoral candidate at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, examined 164 preserved amphibians for the presence of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, or Bd, an infectious pathogen driving many species to extinction. The pathogen is found on every continent inhabited by amphibians and in more than 200 species. Bd causes...


Latest Chytridiomycosis Reference Libraries

Archey’s Frog, Leiopelma archeyi
2014-08-27 09:54:56

Archey’s frog (Leiopelma archeyi) is one of three or four living species within the Leiopelma genus, which holds frogs that are native to New Zealand. This species can only be found along the Coromandel Peninsula and because it has not changed much throughout the past two hundred million years, it is considered to be a living fossil. Little is known about the habits of Archey’s frog, but it is known to be terrestrial, inhabiting damp areas at high elevations. It is thought that males...

Mountain Harlequin Frog, Atelopus Certus
2014-08-05 09:43:02

Mountain Harlequin Frog, Atelopus Certus, is a species of toad belonging to the family Bufonidae. This toad is native to the Darien region of eastern Panama, and its type locality is Cerro Sapo, providing it with its common name, Mountain Harlequin Frog. Its natural habitats are tropical or subtropical moist lowland forests, tropical or subtropical moist montane forests, and rivers. This species is threatened mostly by the advancing wave of chytridiomycosis moving through Central...

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tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.