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Latest Chytridiomycosis Stories

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2011-06-14 13:16:16

Smithsonian scientists have confirmed that chytridiomycosis, a rapidly spreading amphibian disease, has reached a site near Panama's Darien region. This was the last area in the entire mountainous neotropics to be free of the disease. This is troubling news for the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project, a consortium of nine U.S. and Panamanian institutions that aims to rescue 20 species of frogs in imminent danger of extinction. Chytridiomycosis has been linked to dramatic...

2011-05-02 23:49:12

Museum specimens help tell the story Using museum specimens from Mexico, Guatemala and Costa Rica, a team of researchers from San Francisco State University and University of California at Berkeley has documented evidence of a Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) epidemic wave that wiped out native amphibians, according to research to be published on May 3 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (PNAS). More than 40 percent of all amphibian species are currently in decline,...

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2010-11-17 14:00:00

As frogs around the world continue to disappear"”many killed by a rapidly spreading disease called chytridiomycosis, which attacks the skin cells of amphibians"”one critically endangered species has received an encouraging boost. Although the La Loma tree frog, Hyloscirtus colymba, is notoriously difficult to care for in captivity, the Panama Amphibian Rescue and Conservation Project is the first to successfully breed this species. "We are some of the first researchers to attempt...

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2010-08-09 12:55:00

Conservationists are scouring the world for frog species that are thought to be extinct, but may just be hanging on. Expeditions to search for the species known as the golden toad will start in the next two months in 14 countries. Amphibians are the most threatened animals on the planet, with one third of species at risk of extinction. Many have become extinct because of a fungal disease that is carried in the waters they live in. Robin Moore, the scientist leading the project, told BBC...

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2010-07-20 08:12:39

Incidence of a lethal infectious disease moves at a rate of 30 kilometers per year A killer has been caught in the act: the first before-and-after view of an infectious disease that led to an amphibian die-off has been released by the scientists who tracked it. The results are published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Like a wave, incidence of the fungal disease that wipes out Central American frogs--chytridiomycosis--advances through the...

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2010-05-27 08:02:43

Trying to stay ahead of a deadly disease that has wiped out more than 100 species, scientists at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute continue to discover new frog species in Panama: Pristimantis educatoris, from Omar Torrijos National Park, and P. adnus from Darien Province near the Colombian border. In 1989 researchers realized that frogs were dying around the world. Then they identified the cause: a fungal disease called chytridiomycosis. In 2004 Karen Lips, associate professor at...

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2010-05-11 08:10:00

Scientists have unraveled the dynamics of a deadly disease that is wiping out amphibian populations across the globe. New findings, published May 10 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggest that infection intensity -- the severity of the disease among individuals -- determines whether frog populations will survive or succumb to an amphibian fungal disease called Chytridiomycosis. The research identifies a dangerous tipping point in infection intensity, beyond which...

697992ff423fb447f98f25c41322e2f01
2010-01-25 07:33:01

Midwife toads that live in the mountains are highly likely to die from a serious fungal infection, called chytridiomycosis, whereas their infected relatives in the lowlands are not, according to new research published Jan. 24 in Ecology Letters. The authors of the study, from Imperial College London, the Zoological Society of London and the BiodivERsA project RACE, say their findings suggest conservationists may be able to limit the impact of the disease in the mountains by ensuring tourists...

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2009-11-20 07:40:00

Most countries throughout the world participate in the $40-million-per-year culinary trade of frog legs in some way, with 75 percent of frog legs consumed in France, Belgium and the United States. Scientists at the Smithsonian Institution and colleagues have found that this trade is a potential carrier of pathogens deadly to amphibians. The team's findings are published in the scientific journal Frontiers in Ecology, Thursday, Nov. 19. Amphibians are rapidly declining worldwide. More than...

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2009-10-19 14:27:35

A workshop at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama has dramatically improved the ability of conservationists and regulatory agencies to monitor the spread of chytridiomycosis"”one of the deadliest frog diseases on Earth. Caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, this disease is probably responsible for the extinction of nearly 100 frog species since the 1970s. During the past decade, the epidemic swept from the highlands of Costa Rica through western...


Latest Chytridiomycosis Reference Libraries

Archey’s Frog, Leiopelma archeyi
2014-08-27 09:54:56

Archey’s frog (Leiopelma archeyi) is one of three or four living species within the Leiopelma genus, which holds frogs that are native to New Zealand. This species can only be found along the Coromandel Peninsula and because it has not changed much throughout the past two hundred million years, it is considered to be a living fossil. Little is known about the habits of Archey’s frog, but it is known to be terrestrial, inhabiting damp areas at high elevations. It is thought that males...

Mountain Harlequin Frog, Atelopus Certus
2014-08-05 09:43:02

Mountain Harlequin Frog, Atelopus Certus, is a species of toad belonging to the family Bufonidae. This toad is native to the Darien region of eastern Panama, and its type locality is Cerro Sapo, providing it with its common name, Mountain Harlequin Frog. Its natural habitats are tropical or subtropical moist lowland forests, tropical or subtropical moist montane forests, and rivers. This species is threatened mostly by the advancing wave of chytridiomycosis moving through Central...

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.