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Latest Ciguatera Stories

lionfish dinner
2014-08-04 03:00:51

University of Hawaii at Manoa Scientists have learned that recent fears of invasive lionfish causing fish poisoning may be unfounded. If so, current efforts to control lionfish by fishing derbies and targeted fisheries may remain the best way to control the invasion. And there’s a simple way to know for sure whether a lionfish is toxic: test it after it’s been cooked. Pacific lionfish were first reported off the coast of Florida in the 1980's, and have been gaining swiftly in number...

2011-11-09 15:56:40

Scientists are reporting development of a fast, reliable new test that could help people avoid a terrible type of food poisoning that comes from eating fish tainted with a difficult-to-detect toxin from marine algae growing in warm waters. The report appears in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry. Takeshi Yasumoto and colleagues explain that 20,000-60,000 people every year come down with ciguatera poisoning from eating fish tainted with a ciguatoxin -- the most common source of food...

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2011-06-10 08:20:00

Same toxin known to affect humans now identified for the first time in a marine mammal species Researchers from NOAA have discovered a potent and highly-debilitating toxin in the endangered Hawaiian monk seal, a first-of-its-kind chemical finding that is now prompting investigations of other marine mammals in the state. The toxin, ciguatoxin, is produced by marine algae common on coral reefs, and accumulates in fish species that are consumed by humans. Ciguatera, the human disease caused by...

2009-05-18 10:15:51

Ciguatera poisoning, the food-borne disease that can come from eating large, carnivorous reef fish, causes vomiting, headaches, and a burning sensation upon contact with cold surfaces. An early morning walk on cool beach sand can become a painful stroll on fiery coals to a ciguatera victim. But is this common toxin poisoning also the key to a larger mystery? That is, the storied migrations of the Polynesian natives who colonized New Zealand, Easter Island and, possibly, Hawaii in the 11th to...

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2008-02-06 11:25:00

Since November there have been 28 reported cases countrywide of ciguatera fish poisoning according to the FDA. The consumers who reported the illness all ate fish harvested in the northern Gulf of Mexico near the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary. The affected area covers 56 square miles of the northwestern part of the Gulf. Those contaminated include fish such as snapper, amberjack, grouper and barracuda "“ all fish that feed on other fish that consume toxic marine algae....


Latest Ciguatera Reference Libraries

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2008-07-14 18:55:56

The Greasy Grouper (Epinephelus tauvina), also known as the Arabian Grouper, is widely distributed from the Red Sea to South Africa, as far north as Japan, and in the waters around Australia. It is found in clear water areas associated with coral reefs from coast to 1000 feet deep, where it feeds on smaller fish. The Greasy grouper grows up to 30 inches in length. Its head and body are pale greenish gray or brown with round spots, varying from orange-red to dark brown. A group of black...

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Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.