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Latest Cilium Stories

2014-06-27 18:45:05

University of Minnesota Academic Health Center New structures discovered within cilia show a relationship between certain proteins and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. The discovery, made at the University of Minnesota, was named paper of the week in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, and sheds new light on the microstructure of cilia. Cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures occurring in large numbers on the surface of some of the body's cells and are involved in movement and...

Critical Protein For Healthy Cell Growth In Mammals Discovered
2014-01-28 12:37:01

Penn State University A team of researchers from Penn State University and the University of California has discovered a protein that is required for the growth of tiny, but critical, hair-like structures called cilia on cell surfaces. The discovery has important implications for human health because lack of cilia can lead to serious diseases such as polycystic kidney disease, blindness and neurological disorders. "If we want to better understand and treat diseases related to cilium...

Cilia Use Different Molecular Motors For Different Jobs
2014-01-11 08:19:58

Brown University Cilia are one of nature’s great multipurpose tools. The tiny, hair-like fibers protrude from cell membranes and perform all kinds of tasks in all kinds of creatures, from helping clear debris from human lungs to enabling single-celled organisms to swim. Now, physicists from Brown University have discovered something that could help scientists understand how cilia have been adapted for so many varied tasks. The study, led by graduate student Ilyong Jung, looked at the...

2013-12-18 15:01:17

Researchers at Queen Mary University of London have shown for the first time that the specialized role stem cells go on to perform is controlled by primary cilia –tiny hair-like structures protruding from a cell. Stem cells are capable of becoming any cell type within the body through the process of differentiation. The discovery has the potential for application in the development of new therapies for a range of medical treatments where scientists aim to replace or regenerate tissues...

Research Reveals Clues About Molecules And Cilia
2013-05-13 11:15:34

Johns Hopkins Medicine Experiments at Johns Hopkins have unearthed clues about which protein signaling molecules are allowed into hollow, hair-like "antennae," called cilia, that alert cells to critical changes in their environments. Researchers found that the size limit for entry is much greater than previously thought, allowing most of a cell's proteins into cilia. The researchers believe that the specific collection of proteins in each cilium, customized to the needs of each cell...

Sense Of Smell In Mice Restored From Gene Therapy
2012-09-07 14:10:09

A team of scientists from Johns Hopkins and other institutions report that restoring tiny, hair-like structures to defective cells in the olfactory system of mice is enough to restore a lost sense of smell. The results of the experiments were published online this week in Nature Medicine, and are believed to represent the first successful application of gene therapy to restore this function in live mammals. An expert in olfaction, Randall Reed, Ph.D., professor of molecular biology and...

Mucus Helps Clean Out Human Lungs
2012-08-24 10:53:38

Connie K. Ho for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill recently published a study on their work to understand how human lungs clean out mucus from colds and allergy, making the airways free of foreign matter that may be toxic or infectious to the body. The findings, published in a recent issue of the journal Science, will help scientists identify issues related to human lung diseases like asthma, chronic obstructive...

Mechanism For Organ Placement Shared By Human Cells, Plants, Worms And Frogs
2012-07-17 10:19:48

New research identifies special protein that determines what goes where As organisms develop, their internal organs arrange in a consistent asymmetrical pattern--heart and stomach to the left, liver and appendix to the right. But how does this happen? Biologists at Tufts University have produced the first evidence that a class of proteins that make up a cell's skeleton -- tubulin proteins -- drives asymmetrical patterning across a broad spectrum of species, including plants, nematode...

By Keeping Their 'Antennae' Up, Lipid Helps Cells Find Their Way
2012-07-09 15:07:12

A lipid that helps lotion soften the skin also helps cells find and stay in the right location in the body by ensuring they keep their "antennae" up, scientists report. Each cell has an antenna, or cilium, that senses the environment then determines where to go and what to do when it arrives, said Dr. Erhard Bieberich, biochemist at the Medical College of Georgia at Georgia Health Sciences University. "A cell is blind; it does not see, it does not feel; it doesn't know where it is,"...

2012-05-09 14:36:09

Tiny organelles called primary cilia hold the key to combat inflammation Scientists from Queen Mary, University of London have found a new therapeutic target to combat inflammation. The research, published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, revealed tiny organelles called primary cilia are important for regulating inflammation. The findings could lead to potential therapies for millions of people who suffer from arthritis. Dr Martin Knight who led the research at...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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