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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 11:07 EDT

Latest Cilium Stories

2010-01-25 18:14:26

Scientists have identified a gene family that plays a key role in one of the earliest stages of development in which an embryo distinguishes its left side from the right and determines how organs should be positioned within the body. The finding in mice likely will lead to a better understanding of how certain birth defects occur in humans. The study is published in the January 24, 2010, advance online issue of the journal "Nature Cell Biology." "Having clear knowledge of embryonic...

2010-01-19 11:34:29

An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered new links between a common form of inherited blindness affecting children and a gene known as Abelson helper integration site-1 (AHI1). Their findings, which may lead to new therapies and improved diagnostics for retinal disease, will appear online in advance of publication in the journal Nature Genetics on January 17. A newly recognized class of disease known...

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2009-12-28 09:33:28

A protein complex mutated in human disease removes excess signaling molecules to prevent them from damaging cilia, say researchers from UMass Medical School. The study will be published in the December 28 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology. Defective cilia cause a range of diseases including Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), a rare, multi-tissue disorder linked to mutations in 12 different proteins. Seven of these form a complex called the BBSome, but the function of this protein assembly in...

2009-12-02 18:39:59

A new study reveals how molecular motors that power important subcellular movements can generate cyclical motion. The research, published by Cell Press in the December issue of the Biophysical Journal, opens a new door to understanding motor molecules by using a computer program that faithfully simulates movement of hair-like cellular projections. Many cells and single-celled organisms have tiny appendages called cilia and flagella that can wave or oscillate to move fluid across the cell...

2009-08-27 11:35:10

U.S. scientists say they've determined the most common childhood brain tumor is linked to tiny cell filaments once dismissed as vestiges of evolution. The University of California-San Francisco scientists discovered the crucial role of the filaments, called primary cilia, by examining malignant human and mouse brain tumors classified as medulloblastomas. These findings are very exciting, said Professor Arturo Alvarez-Buylla, senior author of the study. He noted cilia have recently been shown...

2009-08-10 11:40:08

U.S.-led researchers have discovered a connection between mutations in the INPP5E gene and ciliopathies, a newly emerging group of diseases. The international team of scientists, led by Dr. Joseph Gleeson, a professor at the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine, said the findings might lead to new therapies for the diseases that are caused by defects in the function or structure of cellular primary cilia, which are small cellular appendages of previously unknown function. The...

2009-08-09 12:40:00

An international team of scientists, led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, have discovered a connection between mutations in the INPP5E gene and ciliopathies. Their findings, which may lead to new therapies for these diseases, will appear in the online edition of Nature Genetics on August 9.Ciliopathies are a newly emerging group of diseases caused by defects in the function or structure of cellular primary cilia, which are small, cellular...

2009-08-04 11:29:14

In the September 1st issue of G&D, Dr. Karen Oegema (UCSD) and colleagues identify the molecular basis of the lethal developmental disorder, hydrolethalus syndrome, and reveal that hydrolethalus syndrome actually belongs to the emerging class of human ciliopathy diseases."5 years ago a human genetics study linked Hydrolethalus syndrome to a mutation in a protein named HYLS1. Since this discovery the function of HYLS1 has remained unknown. Our work solves this mystery, showing that HYLS1...

2009-07-24 15:40:46

The same mechanism that helps you detect bad-tasting and potentially poisonous foods may also play a role in protecting your airway from harmful substances, according to a study by scientists at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. The findings could help explain why injured lungs are susceptible to further damage.The study, published online July 23 in Science Express, shows that receptors for bitter compounds that are found in taste buds on the tongue also...

2009-07-23 14:15:00

Striking high-speed footage shows 2 patterns of flagellar coordinationUsing high-speed cinematography, scientists at Cambridge University have discovered that individual algal cells can regulate the beating of their flagella in and out of synchrony in a manner that controls their swimming trajectories. Their research was published on the 24th July in the journal Science.The researchers studied the unicellular organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has two hair-like appendages known as...