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Latest Cilium Stories

2009-07-23 14:15:00

Striking high-speed footage shows 2 patterns of flagellar coordinationUsing high-speed cinematography, scientists at Cambridge University have discovered that individual algal cells can regulate the beating of their flagella in and out of synchrony in a manner that controls their swimming trajectories. Their research was published on the 24th July in the journal Science.The researchers studied the unicellular organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which has two hair-like appendages known as...

2009-06-30 14:52:10

The equipment used for biomedical research is shrinking, but the physical properties of the fluids under investigation are not changing. This creates a problem: the reservoirs that hold the liquid are now so small that forces between molecules on the liquid's surface dominate, and one can no longer shake the container to mix two fluids. Instead, researchers must bide their time and wait for diffusion to occur.Scientists at the University of Washington hope to speed up biomedical reactions by...

2009-05-11 07:39:13

The mystery of genetic disease is only partially solved with the identification of a mutated gene. Often, the pattern of disease "“ the features or disorders associated with it "“ vary in type and severity among those who are affected. Scientists, physicians and patients all ask why. In this week's journal Nature Genetics, an international consortium of researchers, including some from Baylor College of Medicine, provide not only an explanation for the variations of vision loss in...

2009-04-29 14:05:09

There is no vaccine to prevent swine flu disease, but a U.S. doctor says there are simple ways to help reduce risk of all infections including influenza. Most flus enter our body through our noses, and the organ in our nose that is critical to fighting infection is the nasal cilia, Dr. Murray Grossan, author of Free Yourself from Sinus and Allergy Problems. If you take care of your cilia, and take steps to enhance their ability to ward off infection, you can increase your immune response...

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2008-12-01 16:45:00

UCLA study offers new clues for treatment of vertigo, hearing problemsA UCLA study shows for the first time how microscopic crystals form sound and gravity sensors inside the inner ear. Located at the ends of cilia "” tiny cellular hairs in the ear that move and transmit signals "” these crystals play an important role in detecting sound, maintaining balance and regulating movement.Dislodged ear crystals are to blame for the most common form of vertigo. Known as benign paroxysmal...

2008-08-20 15:01:11

U.S.-led scientists say they've identified a critical protein complex in the growth of cell cilia that might have a key role in many serious diseases. The team led by the New York University Cancer Institute said the protein complex regulates the formation of primary cilia, which are found on virtually all mature human cells and are essential to normal cell function. The researchers led by Professor Brian Dynlacht, director of the institute's Genomics Facility, said the antenna-like...

2005-07-29 15:24:02

A defect in the mechanics of motors that build tiny cellular hairs is the basis of a serious genetic disorder, according to researchers at UC Davis and Simon Fraser University, Canada. Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS), affecting about one in 100,000 births, includes progressive blindness, extra or fused fingers and toes, kidney disease and learning difficulties, among other problems. Products of genes linked to the syndrome coordinate mobile, cargo-carrying motor proteins within the cilia, tiny...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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