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Latest Civet Stories

2005-09-11 12:01:24

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Bats found in Hong Kong carry a virus very similar to the severe acute respiratory syndrome or SARS virus and might be able to spread it, Chinese researchers reported on Friday. They said the horseshoe bats, valued both as food and for their use in Chinese medicine, should be handled with great care. They may have helped spread the virus among different species of animals, the researchers said. SARS first emerged in China in 2002 and in 2003 spread around the...

2005-09-10 09:41:20

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Scientists in China say they have found a genetic relative of the human SARS virus in a local species of bat, raising the possibility that the bats were a primary source of the disease when it was transmitted to humans. After SARS first became a threat in 2002, research suggested the virus may have come from the civet, a catlike wild animal eaten by people in southern China. Thousands were seized from Chinese wildlife markets and slaughtered. The new research raises the...

2005-09-09 21:49:27

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Bats found in Hong Kong carry a virus very similar to the severe acute respiratory syndrome or SARS virus and might be able to spread it, Chinese researchers reported on Friday. They said the horseshoe bats, valued both as food and for their use in Chinese medicine, should be handled with great care. They may have helped spread the virus among different species of animals, the researchers said. SARS first emerged in China in 2002 and in 2003 spread around the...

2005-09-09 21:45:00

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Bats found in Hong Kong carry a virus very similar to the severe acute respiratory syndrome or SARS virus and might be able to spread it, Chinese researchers reported on Friday. They said the horseshoe bats, valued both as food and for their use in Chinese medicine, should be handled with great care. They may have helped spread the virus among different species of animals, the researchers said. SARS first emerged in China in 2002 and in 2003 spread around the world via...

2005-08-30 14:40:30

A far wider range of wildlife species could be at risk from bird flu, warns a biologist from the University of East Anglia. Dr Diana Bell, of UEA's School of Biological Sciences, says the discovery that avian flu was responsible for the death of three rare civet cats in Cuc Phuong National Park in Vietnam, raises important questions about the range of wildlife species which could now be at risk from this virus. "Vietnam and the other Asian countries chronically infected with avian flu are...

2005-08-25 22:42:45

HANOI (Reuters) - The bird flu virus which has killed more than 60 people in Asia and is heading West has been found in three civets which died at a Vietnamese national park, an official said on Friday. Do Van Lap, a manager at the Cuc Phuong National Park, said the endangered Owston's palm civets, born in captivity and raised in the same cage, died in late June and tests of their samples at a Hong Kong laboratory confirmed they had bird flu. "How they were infected remains unknown...


Latest Civet Reference Libraries

Large Indian Civet, Viverra zibetha
2013-06-07 14:01:12

The large Indian civet (Viverra zibetha) is species that can be found in Southeast Asia. Its range includes Bhutan, Myanmar, Thailand, Nepal, northeast India, Laos, China, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos. It prefers a habitat within a variety of areas, including primary and secondary evergreen and deciduous forests. It can be found at elevations of up to 5,429 feet. It holds five recognized subspecies that occur throughout its range, and some experts assert that a sixth subspecies should be...

Malayan Civet, Viverra tangalunga
2013-06-07 13:21:50

The Malayan civet (Viverra tangalunga), also known as the oriental civet or the Malay civet, is a member of the Viverridae family which contains linsangs and genets. This civet can only be found on the islands of Borneo, Sumatra, Bangka, the Philippines, the Rhio Archipelago, and the Malay Peninsula. It prefers a wide variety of habitats including forests, the outer areas of villages, and cultivated lands. It has been found at elevations up to 3,608 feet in Kelabit Upland in Sarawak and 2,952...

Golden Paradoxurus
2013-04-29 15:50:54

The golden paradoxurus (Paradoxurus aureus), also known as the golden wet-zone palm civet or the golden palm civet, is native to Sri Lanka. It prefers a habitat within damp forests, submontane forests, and possibly cloud forests located in the Knuckles Mountain Range, the Central Highlands, and Namunukula. Members of this species can be golden brown to reddish brown in color with no special markings, although the underbelly is pale in color. It was once classified with Paradoxurus...

Brown Palm Civet
2013-04-29 15:47:02

The brown palm civet (Paradoxurus jerdoni), also known as Jerdon's palm civet, is native to the Western Ghats in India. Its range is relatively small, extending from Castle Rock in Goa south to the Western Ghats in Kalakkad Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve. The Sulawesi palm civet is sometimes referred to as the brown palm civet because it is brown, but it is a distinct species. The brown palm civet holds two recognized subspecies. The brown palm civet is around the same size as the common palm...

Golden Palm Civet, Paradoxurus zeylonensis
2012-12-10 12:00:05

The golden palm civet (Paradoxurus zeylonensis) is a small mammal that can be found in Sri Lanka. Its range is fragmented into separate areas, including the Sinharaja Forest area, Uda Walawe National Park, and Wasgomuwa and Yala National Parks. It prefers a habitat in evergreen, monsoon, and lowland forests. The coat of this civet is dark brown to brownish gold in color. Although there is not much information about this species, it is thought to consume many things like insects, berries,...

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Word of the Day
lunula
  • A small crescent-shaped structure or marking, especially the white area at the base of a fingernail that resembles a half-moon.
This word is a diminutive of the Latin 'luna,' moon.
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