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Latest Civil engineering and infrastructure repair in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina Stories

2008-09-02 09:00:18

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- Waves crashed high against flood walls Monday and New Orleans' rebuilt levee system survived its first hurricane in three years, but Gustav exposed weaknesses the Army Corps of Engineers won't plug any time soon. Gustav was no Katrina. It was smaller, and the worst rain and wind missed New Orleans. Its storm surge -- between 10 and 15 feet lower than Katrina's -- entered New Orleans through navigation channels in the east and washed over the Industrial Canal. The...

2008-06-28 06:00:03

By Jennifer A. Bowen, Belleville News-Democrat, Ill. Jun. 28--The levees on the Illinois side of the river continues to hold back the Mississippi River, and pressure was eased somewhat when a levee that protects Winfield, Mo., failed early Friday. "The word I'm getting from the teams out there checking on the levees every day is: Everything is working as predicted," said Alan J. Dooley, a spokesman with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Louis. "We continue to monitor the entire system....

2008-06-27 21:00:23

By Jennifer A. Bowen, Belleville News-Democrat, Ill. Jun. 27--The levees on the Illinois side of the river continue to hold back the Mississippi River, and pressure was eased somewhat when a levee that protects Winfield, Mo., failed early Friday. "The word I'm getting from the teams out there checking on the levees every day is: Everything is working as predicted," said Alan J. Dooley, a spokesman with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Louis. "We continue to monitor the entire system....

2005-10-03 14:31:35

NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - High tides due to gusty winds threatened renewed flooding in storm-ravaged New Orleans, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said on Monday, but steps were being taken to prevent it. The Corps said it was closing two canals where levee breaches poured water into the city after Hurricane Katrina and adding sandbags to temporary levee repairs already in place. Strong east winds had pushed tides higher than normal, the Corps said in a statement, and water already was...

2005-09-30 18:49:41

By Kenneth Li NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - Thousands of people began returning to storm-ravaged New Orleans on Friday, but local officials said they feared fragile levees could give way once again if another hurricane strikes. Roadblocks and checkpoints restricting access into the city were removed, allowing people who had not seen their homes in a month to get their first look at the damage caused when Hurricane Katrina smashed into the Gulf Coast and flooded 80 percent of the city....

2005-09-30 14:27:20

By Kenneth Li NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - Thousands of people began returning to storm-ravaged New Orleans on Friday, but local officials said they feared that fragile levees could give way once again if another hurricane strikes. Roadblocks and checkpoints restricting access into the city were removed, allowing people who have not seen their homes in a month to get their first look at the damage caused when Hurricane Katrina battered the Gulf Coast and flooded 80 percent of the city....

2005-09-30 12:36:12

By Ken Li NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - Thousands of people began returning to storm-ravaged New Orleans on Friday, but local officials voiced fears that fragile levees could give way once again if another hurricane strikes. Roadblocks and checkpoints restricting access into the city were removed, allowing people who have not seen their homes in a month to get their first look at the damage caused when Hurricane Katrina battered the Gulf Coast and flooded 80 percent of the city. The...

2005-09-23 09:59:05

NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - Water is spilling over a levee in New Orleans as the outer edge of Hurricane Rita dumps rain on the city, an official with the Army Corps of Engineers said on Friday. "We have discovered an overtopping on the industrial canal," Army Corps of Engineers spokesman Mitch Frazier told local radio. The Army Corps had repaired the section after Hurricane Katrina flooded the Lower Ninth Ward section of the city. Water seeped through the repaired section on Thursday.

2005-09-10 18:40:18

BATON ROUGE, Louisiana (Reuters) - U.S. officials overseeing the draining of New Orleans on Saturday cut in half the time they expect it will take to bail out the water-logged city. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers spokesman Dan Hitchings said the work could now be complete by October 18, about 40 days after pumping began. The corps originally estimated it could take up to 80 days to dry out portions of the city which were flooded after Hurricane Katrina hit on August 29 and protective...

2005-09-05 18:42:28

HOUSTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has closed a major gap in the New Orleans levees battered by Hurricane Katrina and is pumping water from the flooded city, an agency spokesman said Monday. The Corps was still working to plug another major breach in the levees built to keep out the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain, which nearly surround the city, spokesman John Hall said. The levees broke in several places when Katrina blew through August 29 with a massive...