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Latest Clam Stories

2009-08-19 15:19:44

A tiny import, the Asian clam, is a growing problem in Lake Tahoe on the California-Nevada border. The dime-sized bivalves were first noticed in the lake bottom in 2002, the San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News reported. Now, they have spread to an area on the south shore. Lake Tahoe is a place that people have tried hard to protect, said John Reuter, an aquatic ecologist with the University of California at Davis. "These invasive species get us further and further away from the pristine...

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2009-08-19 08:45:00

Released today, UC Davis' annual Lake Tahoe health report describes a spreading Asian clam population that could put sharp shells and rotting algae on the spectacular mountain lake's popular beaches, possibly aid an invasion of quagga and zebra mussels, and even affect lake clarity and ecology."Our collaborative UC Davis and University of Nevada, Reno, science team found up to 3,000 Asian clams per square meter at locations between Zephyr Point and Elk Point in the southeastern portion of the...

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2008-12-03 08:25:11

With their sedentary lifestyles and filter-feeding habits, clams have been silent witnesses to the changes that humans have inflicted upon their waters. These clams are silent no more, as Dr. Ruth H. Carmichael of the Dauphin Island Sea Lab and her colleagues have reported in their recent paper in the prestigious journal Aquatic Biology. Using stable isotope techniques, Carmichael demonstrated it is possible to identify and trace wastewater inputs to estuaries and coastal food webs by...

2008-10-16 18:00:15

A U.S. ecologist says he's found a commercially valuable species of clam thriving in oxygen-depleted waters of a so-called "dead zone" off the East Coast. Andrew Altieri, a post-doctoral researcher at Brown University, discovered the population of quahog clams increased in hypoxic zones, defined as areas in which dissolved oxygen in the water has been depleted. He said he determined whether quahog clams have a natural capacity to survive in oxygen-starved waters, but their predators...

2008-09-18 15:00:24

Prepare for pumpkins, big ones and flying ones. The second annual North Smithfield Great Pumpkin Festival is Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the high school, at the junction of Routes 5 and 104. There will be batting cages and pony rides, clowns and balloon sculptors, food and music. The featured performer is King's Row, an oldies harmony group. The featured foods are many: chowder, clam cakes, sausages, etc., offered by 45 different nonprofit organizations in town. There will be an...

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2008-08-30 14:10:00

Scientists have found a new species of giant clam in the Red Sea. It is the first new living species of giant clam that has been discovered in 20 years. The species, Tridacna costata, accounted for more that 80% of local giant clams 125,000 years ago, but researchers now believe the species may be critically endangered. The researchers suggest in Current Biology journal that their findings may represent one of the earliest examples of marine organism over-exploitation.The species, which is...

2008-07-15 06:00:30

By Jennifer Smith, Newsday, Melville, N.Y. Jul. 15--Clam harvests in the Great South Bay were in steep decline by the time brown tide arrived on Long Island in 1985, but this year's historically most widespread algae bloom has generated renewed concern and an unprecedented attempt to involve the federal government. Speaking yesterday at a Patchogue dock against a backdrop of water darkened by brown tide, Sen. Charles Schumer and Brookhaven Town Supervisor Brian Foley called on the...

2008-05-18 03:00:16

By Jennifer Smith, Newsday, Melville, N.Y. May 18--Brown tide, the algae that triggered the collapse of Long Island's scallop fishery, has reappeared in the Great South Bay for the first time since 2001 and spread farther west than ever before. The blooming algae has turned water from Patchogue to Massapequa Park a cloudy brown, Suffolk County health officials said. It has not been found farther east, nor in the Peconic or Shinnecock Bays. Aureococcus anophagefferens, the tiny...

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2007-12-31 18:00:00

LAKE WORTH, Fla. - A Florida man was about halfway through a plate of steamed clams when he chomped down on something hard - a rare, iridescent purple pearl. George Brock and his wife, Leslie, had been spending a day at the beach Friday in South Florida and stopped at Dave's Last Resort & Raw Bar for a bite. Their find could be worth thousands. "Few are round and few are a lovely color, so this is rare," said gemologist Antoinette Matlins. "I think they have found something precious and...

2007-10-18 09:00:16

By SETH BORENSTEIN By Seth Borenstein The Associated Press In one of the earliest hints of "modern" living, humans 164,000 years ago put on primitive makeup and hit the seashore for steaming mussels, new archaeological finds show. Call it a beach party for early man. But it's a beach party thrown by people who weren't supposed to be advanced enough for this type of behavior. What was found in a cave in South Africa may change how scientists believe Homo sapiens marched into...


Latest Clam Reference Libraries

Corbicula fluminea
2013-10-11 11:17:31

Corbicula fluminea is a species of freshwater clam, an aquatic bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Corbiculidae. This species is originally from Asian origin, therefore it is often referred to as the Asian Clam or Asiatic Clam. Within the aquarium and koi pond trade it is frequently called the Golden Clam or Golden Freshwater Clam. Within southeast Asia its known as the Prosperity Clam or the Good Luck Clam. It has been introduced into many parts of the world such as North America...

Noble Pen Shell, Pinna Nobilis
2013-04-25 16:25:11

The Noble Pen Shell, Pinna Nobilis, is a species of large saltwater clam, a marine bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Pinnidae. This bivalve shell can be as large as almost 3 feet in length, and the shape is somewhat variable. Like all pen shells, it is quite fragile. It attaches itself to rocks using a strong byssus made up of many silk like hairs. These are fibers that are secreted by the animal. Brilliant mother of pearl lines the inside of the shell. This species is native to...

Turkey Wing Ark Clam, Arca zebra
2013-04-16 21:32:14

Arca zebra, known also as the turkey wing ark clam, is a bivalve mollusk within the family Arcidae, the ark clams. This species can be found along the Atlantic coast of North America, ranging from North Carolina to the West Indies and Bermuda. It attaches itself to rocks or other hard substrates in shallow water with byssus threads. The shell of this species is boldly striped in brown and white which gives it the look of the wing off of a wild turkey. The whole shell has also been said...

Spondylus Varius
2013-04-16 19:08:59

Spondylus varius, a species of large saltwater clam, is a marine bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Spondylidae, the thorny oysters. Spondylus varius reaches a maximum of about 15 to 20 centimeters. It lives at depths of up to 30 meters and, like most bivalves, is a filter feeder, utilizing plankton as a food source. This species can be seen in the Indo-Pacific Ocean, China, Australia, Philippines, Taiwan and Japan. Image Caption: Live specimen of Spondylus varius, in...

Fragile File Clam, Limaria fragilis
2013-04-16 19:05:32

The Fragile File Clam, Limaria fragilis, is a species of bivalve mollusk belonging to the family Limidae. It’s found in shallow waters in the Indian and Pacific Oceans and is able to swim. This clam has a pair of hinged, thin, asymmetric white valves and a red mantle with a fringe of long and tapering pink and grey banded tentacles at its edge. Also around the margin of the mantle is a row of tiny eyespots that can detect light and shade, and might alert the animal of an approaching...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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