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Latest Classical genetics Stories

pygmy phenotype
2014-08-21 03:00:37

A'ndrea Elyse Messer, Penn State The small body size associated with the pygmy phenotype is probably a selective adaptation for rainforest hunter-gatherers, according to an international team of researchers, but all African pygmy phenotypes do not have the same genetic underpinning, suggesting a more recent adaptation than previously thought. "I'm interested in how rainforest hunter-gatherers have adapted to their very challenging environments," said George H. Perry, assistant professor...

Long-grain rice plant
2014-08-15 03:12:54

Iqbal Pittalwala, University of California, Riverside UC Riverside-led research could revolutionize hybrid breeding in agriculture Genomic prediction, a new field of quantitative genetics, is a statistical approach to predicting the value of an economically important trait in a plant, such as yield or disease resistance. The method works if the trait is heritable, as many traits tend to be, and can be performed early in the life cycle of the plant, helping reduce costs. Now a...

2014-07-15 09:59:46

University of Oxford Early maize farmers selected for genes that improved the harvesting of sunlight, a new detailed study of how plants use 'doubles' of their genomes reveals. The findings could help current efforts to improve existing crop varieties. Oxford University researchers captured a 'genetic snapshot' of maize as it existed 10 million years ago when the plant made a double of its genome – a 'whole genome duplication' event. They then traced how maize evolved to use these...

Genetic Study Tackles Slow Plant Domestication Mystery
2014-04-18 08:06:55

By Diana Lutz, Washington University in St. Louis Domestication genes tend to be insensitive to the rest of the genome and to the environment. Could finding this subset of robust genes have slowed things down? “The Modern View of Domestication,” a special feature of The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) published April 29, raises a number of startling questions about a transition in our deep history that most of us take for granted. At the end of the last Ice...

Geneticists Map Genome Of An Important Global Crop: The Peanut
2014-04-03 07:29:48

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Peanuts are seemingly everywhere in the US. From cooking oils to candy bars, peanuts are a part of our lives, and a big business. And now, for the first time, a multinational group of crop geneticists has sequenced the peanut genome. The researchers are from the International Peanut Genome Initiative (IPGI), led by Scott Jackson, who serves as chair of the IPGI. Jackson is also the director of the University of Georgia Center for...

2014-01-10 10:44:18

Single cell analysis captures a genomic phenomenon that fuels the complexity and diversity of living things A Ludwig Cancer Research study has uncovered a phenomenon that alters prevailing views of how the genome is expressed to make and sustain the life of mammals. Published in the journal Science, the paper helps explain why genetically identical animals are sometimes so different in their biology and appearance, and why some inherited disorders caused by a shared set of aberrant genes...

Brown University
2014-01-06 08:12:29

Brown University Mating and meiosis – the specialized cell division that reduces the number of chromosomes in a cell – are related, but in most yeasts they are regulated separately. Not so in Candida lusitaniae, where the two programs work in unison, according to a new study in Nature. Comparison with other species suggests that this fusion may support C. lusitaniae’s “haploid lifestyle” of maintaining only one set of chromosomes in each cell. From a biological point of view,...

Researchers Discover Molecular Causes For Sex Determination In Honey Bees
2013-12-31 06:56:40

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports – Your Universe Online New research appearing in the December issue of the journal Cell Biology puts together the final pieces in a puzzle 200 years in the making – determining the molecular evolution in the genes that separate male honey bees from female ones. Lead author Martin Beye, a professor with the Institute of Evolutionary Genetics at the University of Düsseldorf, and his colleagues studied 14 natural sequence variants of the complementary...

2013-11-26 14:25:32

Plants can reproduce in a multitude of different ways, unlike humans and animals. Scientists at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna have been working on developing new varieties of chamomile that can be cultivated as a medicinal plant. The researchers have been trying to identify varieties that will bloom longer and make its cultivation easier. Their methods and results have recently been published in the scientific press. Chamomile is a medicinal plant used mainly in the...

Kiwi Genome Reveals A Few Surprises
2013-10-27 05:36:19

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Scientists working to sequence the genome of the kiwifruit have revealed that the berry has recently undergone a pair of whole-genome duplication events, according to new research published earlier this month in the journal Nature Communications. Zhangjun Fei, an associate professor at the Boyce Thompson Institute at Cornell University, and his colleagues also discovered that there were many similarities between the kiwi’s more...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.