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Scientists Discover On-Off Switch To A Persons Consciousness

Scientists Discover On-Off Switch To A Person's Consciousness

Alan McStravick for redOrbit.com - Your Universe online An orchestra, consisting of woodwinds, strings, percussion and brass instruments, each work off a score specific to the instrument they are playing. They each contribute a layer to the...

Latest Claustrum Stories

2013-01-16 22:12:53

Findings also illustrate how individuals can train their brains to handle injuries more efficiently For the first time, scientists at Carnegie Mellon University's Center for Cognitive Brain Imaging (CCBI) have used a new combination of neural imaging methods to discover exactly how the human brain adapts to injury. The research, published in Cerebral Cortex, shows that when one brain area loses functionality, a "back-up" team of secondary brain areas immediately activates, replacing not...

Bird Brains Help In Study Of The Mammalian Neocortex
2012-10-02 11:02:13

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Humans and other mammals have a seemingly unique part of the brain called the neocortex, which is a layered structure on the outer surface where higher-order processing is thought to occur. A new study from the University of Chicago found similar cells in the brains of birds, but in a vastly different anatomical structure. Confirming a 50-year hypothesis about the identity of a mysterious structure in the bird brain, the new study...

The More Altruistic You Are, The More Gray Matter You Have
2012-07-11 20:45:39

The volume of a small brain region influences one's predisposition for altruistic behavior. Researchers from the University of Zurich show that people who behave more altruistically than others have more gray matter at the junction between the parietal and temporal lobe, thus showing for the first time that there is a connection between brain anatomy, brain activity and altruistic behavior. Why are some people very selfish and others very altruistic? Previous studies indicated that social...

2012-06-27 22:26:20

Long-term aim is to develop new treatments to block the spread of damaged proteins in the brain Van Andel Institute announces that researchers at Lund University in Sweden have published a study detailing how Parkinson's disease spreads through the brain. Experiments in rat models uncover a process previously used to explain mad cow disease, in which misfolded proteins travel from sick to healthy cells. This model has never before been identified so clearly in a living organism, and the...

Area Of Brain Identified That Determines Distance From Which Sound Originates
2012-06-12 06:40:52

MGH team uses functional imaging to find neurons sensitive to distance but not loudness Researchers at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital have identified a portion of the brain responsible for determining how far away a sound originates, a process that does not rely solely on how loud the sound is. The investigators' report, which will appear in the early edition of Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, is receiving early online release...

2012-04-20 12:06:54

Breakdown of white-matter pathways affects decision-making as we age If you are an aging baby boomer and you've noticed it's a bit harder to drive to unfamiliar locations or to pick a new brand of olive oil at the supermarket, you can blame it on the white matter in your brain. A brain-mapping study, published in the Apr. 11 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, has found that people's ability to make decisions in novel situations decreases with age and is associated with a reduction in...

2012-01-06 15:17:48

Pioneering vision study in mice will help revolutionize the study of brain function and mental disease There's a 3-D world in our brains. It's a landscape that mimics the outside world, where the objects we see exist as collections of neural circuits and electrical impulses. Now, scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies are using new tools they developed to chart that world, a key step in revolutionizing research into the neurological basis of vision. For the first...

Are We Actually In Love With Our iPhones?
2011-10-03 05:31:50

Academic researchers across the Internet were buzzing this weekend over an editorial, which appeared on the New York Times website on Friday, claiming that iPhone users literally "loved" their popular, multi-functional smartphone. "With Apple widely expected to release its iPhone 5 on Tuesday, Apple addicts across the world are getting ready for their latest fix," branding consultant Martin Lindstrom wrote in the opinion piece. "But should we really characterize the intense consumer...

2011-07-14 13:02:21

Research conducted by Maria Ercsey-Ravasz and Zoltan Toroczkai of the University of Notre Dame's Interdisciplinary Center for Network Science and Applications (iCeNSA), along with the Department of Physics and a group of neuroanatomists in France, has revealed previously unknown information about the primate brain. The researchers published an article in the journal Cerebral Cortex showing that the brain is characterized by a highly consistent, weighted network among the functional areas of...

2011-05-09 14:21:23

In the wild, mammals survive because they can see and evade predators lurking in the shadowy bushes. That ability translates to the human world. Transportation Security Administration screeners can pick out dangerous objects in an image of our messy and stuffed suitcases. We get out of the house every morning because we find our car keys on that cluttered shelf next to the door. This ability to recognize target objects surrounded by distracters is one of the remarkable functions of our...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.