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Latest Claustrum Stories

2011-07-14 13:02:21

Research conducted by Maria Ercsey-Ravasz and Zoltan Toroczkai of the University of Notre Dame's Interdisciplinary Center for Network Science and Applications (iCeNSA), along with the Department of Physics and a group of neuroanatomists in France, has revealed previously unknown information about the primate brain. The researchers published an article in the journal Cerebral Cortex showing that the brain is characterized by a highly consistent, weighted network among the functional areas of...

2011-05-09 14:21:23

In the wild, mammals survive because they can see and evade predators lurking in the shadowy bushes. That ability translates to the human world. Transportation Security Administration screeners can pick out dangerous objects in an image of our messy and stuffed suitcases. We get out of the house every morning because we find our car keys on that cluttered shelf next to the door. This ability to recognize target objects surrounded by distracters is one of the remarkable functions of our...

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2010-10-27 13:55:00

Move over, touchpad screens: New research funded in part by the National Institutes of Health shows that it is possible to manipulate complex visual images on a computer screen using only the mind. The study, published in Nature, found that when research subjects had their brains connected to a computer displaying two merged images, they could force the computer to display one of the images and discard the other. The signals transmitted from each subject's brain to the computer were derived...

2010-10-19 16:49:41

An international collaboration led by academics at the University of Sheffield, has shed new light into Parkinson´s disease, which could help with the development of cures or treatments in the future. The collaboration, which was led by Professor Peter Redgrave from the University´s Department of Psychology, suggests that many of the problems suffered by patients with Parkinson´s disease - difficulties in initiating actions, slow...

2010-04-13 16:48:43

A new study, the first of its kind, combines two complementary analytical brain imaging techniques, to provide a more comprehensive and accurate picture of the neuroanatomy of the autistic brain. The study, published in the April issue of neuroimaging journal Human Brain Mapping, was conducted by researchers at The Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital "“ The Neuro, McGill University and the Universit© de Montr©al. The findings provide critical insight into autism and...

2010-02-13 09:39:30

New insights on what causes Alzheimer's disease could arise from a recent discovery made by bioengineers from the University of California, San Diego. The finding concerns the infamous amyloid beta peptides (AÃŽ²)"”fragments of which form plaques thought to play a role in Alzheimer's disease. The bioengineers found that amyloid beta peptides (AÃŽ²) spontaneously trigger calcium waves in purified cultures of astrocyte cells extracted from the cortex...

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2009-09-03 23:30:00

New study shows striking similarity in the evolution of brains, cities Cities are organized like brains, and the evolution of cities mirrors the evolution of human and animal brains, according to a new study by researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Just as advanced mammalian brains require a robust neural network to achieve richer and more complex thought, large cities require advanced highways and transportation systems to allow larger and more productive populations. The new...

2009-08-27 07:40:27

For years, researchers have suggested teens who exhibit risky and destructive behaviors may be influenced by underdeveloped brains. New research suggests just the opposite. A new study suggests teenagers who engage in risky behaviors develop more mature white matter tracts in the brain at a younger age. Normally, by a person's mid-twenties, white matter becomes dense and organized, signaling full maturity of the brain. In the study, conducted at Emory University and the Emory School of...

2009-05-08 09:36:02

Pattern of firing in nerve cells may show degree of confidence in choiceCountless times a day people judge their confidence in a choice they are about to make -- that they now can safely turn left at this intersection, that they aren't sure of their answer on a quiz, that their hot coffee has cooled enough to drink.University of Washington (UW) researchers who study how the brain makes decisions are uncovering the biological mechanisms behind the belief that a choice is likely to be correct....

2009-04-03 10:42:42

As we look at the world around us, images flicker into our brains like so many disparate pixels on a computer screen that change every time our eyes move, which is several times a second. Yet we don't perceive the world as a constantly flashing computer display.Why not?Neuroscientists at The Johns Hopkins University think that part of the answer lies in a special region of the brain's visual cortex which is in charge of distinguishing between background and foreground images. Writing in a...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.