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Latest Climate change and agriculture Stories

2012-07-03 10:17:57

Though worries about "nuclear winter" have faded since the end of the Cold War, existing stockpiles of nuclear weapons still hold the potential for devastating global impacts. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin—Madison and Rutgers University have found that the climate effects of a hypothetical nuclear war between India and Pakistan would greatly reduce yields of staple crops, even in distant countries. The work, by Mutlu Ozdogan and Chris Kucharik of the Center for...

2012-04-23 22:22:36

Knowledge network to inform everything from local climate smart farming to global climate talks Today, recognizing the knowledge gap between the existing evidence of climate change and adaptation on the ground, researchers in Asia launched a novel learning platform to improve agricultural resilience to changing weather patterns, and to reduce emissions footprint. The Climate Smart Agriculture Learning Platform for South Asia, established by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change,...

2012-04-04 20:33:57

Impact of climate change on China explored in new plant science virtual issue New research into the impact of climate change on Chinese cereal crops has found rainfall has a greater impact than rising temperature. The research, published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture found that while maize is sensitive to warming increases in temperature from 1980 onwards correlated with both higher and lower yields of rice and wheat. The study was carried by Dr. Tianyi Zhang,...

Worldwide Food Demand May Double By 2050
2011-11-22 06:09:56

Researchers at the University of Minnesota´s College of Biological Sciences have calculated that food demands by 2050 may double worldwide. Doubling the world's food production, they predict, will put a strain on the environment by significantly increasing the amount of carbon dioxide and nitrogen produced, which will cause the loss of many species throughout the world. But the paper shows that using high-yield farming techniques and efficient use of nitrogen fertilizers can help...

2011-03-25 18:49:59

The effects of climate change and population growth on agricultural land area vary from region to region, according to a new study by University of Illinois researchers. Regions with relative high latitudes "“ China, Russia and the U.S. "“ could see a significant increase in arable land in coming years, but Africa, Europe and India and South America could lose land area. Civil and environmental engineering professor Ximing Cai and graduate student Xiao Zhang published their...

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2010-10-08 10:01:44

Large-scale crop failures like the one that caused the recent Russian wheat crisis are likely to become more common under climate change due to an increased frequency of extreme weather events, a new study shows. However, the worst effects of these events on agriculture could be mitigated by improved farming and the development of new crops, according to the research by the University of Leeds, the Met Office Hadley Centre and University of Exeter. The unpredictability of the weather is one...

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2010-07-08 09:50:20

Although global grain production must double by 2050 to address rising population and demand, new data from the University of Illinois suggests crop yields will suffer unless new approaches to adapt crop plants to climate change are adopted. Improved agronomic traits responsible for the remarkable increases in yield accomplished during the past 50 years have reached their ceiling for some of the world's most important crops. "Global change is happening so quickly that its impact on...

2009-04-27 16:11:22

U.S. plant molecular biologists say they are developing gene variants of wheat, rice and corn that can produce increased yields under heat stress. The researchers say the crops under development might be able to prevent the most devastating effects of climate change since rising temperatures associated with global warming are expected to devastate staples, such as rice and corn, by the end of the century. There is a chance that we might be able to stem the effects on plant yield from this...

2005-09-05 13:21:36

By Patricia Reaney DUBLIN (Reuters) - About 50 million more people, most of them in Africa, could be at risk of hunger by 2050 due to climate change and reduced crop yields, scientists predicted on Monday. Roughly 500 million people worldwide already face hunger but rising levels of greenhouse gases could make the problem worse. "We expect climate change to aggravate current problems of the number of millions of people at risk of hunger, probably to the tune of 50 million," said...


Word of the Day
omphalos
  • The navel or umbilicus.
  • In Greek archaeology: A central boss, as on a shield, a bowl, etc.
  • A sacred stone in the temple of Apollo at Delphi, believed by the Greeks to mark the 'navel' or exact center-point of the earth.
'Omphalos' comes from the ancient Greek.
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