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Latest Climate Change Science Program Stories

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2009-01-17 14:05:00

The Environmental Protection Agency said on Friday rising seal levels on the United States' mid-Atlantic coast are happening faster than the global average because of global warming.The continued rise is threatening the future of coastal communities.The EPA released a report detailing coastal waters from New York to North Carolina have crept up by an average of 0.09 to 0.17 inches a year, compared with an average global increase of 0.07 inches a year.The report was commissioned by the Climate...

2009-01-16 13:14:28

Slight changes in climate may trigger major abrupt ecosystem responses that are not easily reversible. Some of these responses, including insect outbreaks, wildfire, and forest dieback, may adversely affect people as well as ecosystems and their plants and animals. The U.S. Geological Survey led a new assessment of the implications of a warming world on "ecological thresholds" in North America. The report, which was commissioned by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and authored by a...

2009-01-16 09:00:00

WASHINGTON, Jan. 16 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Scientists need a more detailed understanding of how human-produced atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect climate in order to produce better predictions of Earth's future climate, according to a NASA-led report issued by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program on Friday. (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) "Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts," is the latest in a series of Climate Change...

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2009-01-16 09:40:00

WASHINGTON -- Scientists need a more detailed understanding of how human-produced atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect climate in order to produce better predictions of Earth's future climate, according to a NASA-led report issued by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program on Friday. "Atmospheric Aerosol Properties and Climate Impacts," is the latest in a series of Climate Change Science Program reports that addresses various aspects of the country's highest priority climate...

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2008-09-09 10:31:11

The nation faces challenges in utilizing Earth science information to manage resources and protect public health, according to a NASA-sponsored report issued Monday by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The report examines the computer-based decision support tools that many government agencies use to make predictions and forecasts in areas such as agricultural productivity, air quality, renewable energy resources, water management, and the prevention of vector-borne disease. The authors...

2008-08-03 03:00:27

By Jeffrey Weiss, The Dallas Morning News Aug. 3--The effects of climate change will make some people sick and place new burdens on many local health departments, according to two new national reports. But there's good news for Dallas. The North Texas climate is already so, um, challenging that most of the potential horribles are already on the to-do list for local health officials. Deadly heat waves? Check. Killer thunderstorms and tornadoes? Check. Sickening smog? Check. Mosquitoes...

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2008-07-19 00:10:00

The Environmental Protection Agency, in a new report echoing dozens of previous scientific studies, warns that climate change will be hazardous to our health. In the West, the EPA forecasts hotter and more polluted cities will make some people sick and kill others. More wildfires will irritate eyes and lungs. Higher ozone will make breathing harder for the most vulnerable lungs. Trout fishing will evaporate on many streams. Drought will mean water shortages and conflict. Part of the federal...

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2008-07-18 00:05:00

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released a report Thursday that found global warming to be a substantial risk to human health and the American way of life. The EPA has been ridiculed in recent days for supposedly discounting the threat of climate change. The report, called "Analyses of the Effects of Global Change on Human Health and Welfare and Human Systems," also identifies strategies to respond to the challenges of a changing climate. It also outlines long-term research goals...

2008-07-18 06:00:29

By Judy Fahys, The Salt Lake Tribune Jul. 18--The Environmental Protection Agency, in a new report echoing dozens of previous scientific studies, warns that climate change will be hazardous to our health. In the West, the EPA forecasts hotter and more polluted cities will make some people sick and kill others. More wildfires will irritate eyes and lungs. Higher ozone will make breathing harder for the most vulnerable lungs. Trout fishing will evaporate on many streams. Drought will mean...

2008-07-17 21:00:23

To: NATIONAL EDITORS Contact: Dr. John Balbus, +1-301-908-8186, jbalbus@edf.org, or Sean Crowley, +1-202-550-6524, scrowley@edf.org, both of Environmental Defense Fund WASHINGTON, July 17 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A report released today by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concludes that the United States is likely to have the resources necessary to alleviate most direct health threats from climate change. However, the report also concludes there will be an additional burden on...


Word of the Day
drawcansir
  • A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
This word is named for Draw-Can-Sir, a character in George Villiers' 17th century play The Rehearsal.
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