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Why Global Warming Is Taking A Break

Why Global Warming Is Taking A Break

Fabio Bergamin, ETH Zurich The average temperature on Earth has barely risen over the past 16 years. ETH researchers have now found out why. And they believe that global warming is likely to continue again soon. Global warming is currently...

Latest Climate history Stories

2014-08-20 23:04:05

National laboratories, including the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, are teaming up with academia and industry to unleash high performance computing (HPC) on climate change through a new project funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Livermore, California (PRWEB) August 20, 2014 High performance computing (HPC) will be used to develop and apply the most complete climate and Earth system model to address the most challenging and demanding climate change issues. Eight...

2014-08-18 23:09:40

Friends of Science Society has sent a letter to the Committee on Publishing Ethics (COPE) asking them to review the ethics of the Stephan Lewandowsky paper “NASA Faked the Moon Landing…” published in Psychological Science journal, stating that paper violates ethical and empirical standards. Friends of Science also note that the journal is “the highest ranked empirical journal in psychology” but the data base in the Lewandowsky et al (2013) paper did not include a single blog that...

Human Contribution To Glacier Mass Loss Increasing
2014-08-18 03:43:32

University of Innsbruck By combining climate and glacier models, scientists headed by Ben Marzeion from the University of Innsbruck have found unambiguous evidence for anthropogenic glacier mass loss in recent decades. In a paper published in Science, the researchers report that about one quarter of the global glacier mass loss during the period of 1851 to 2010 is attributable to anthropogenic causes. The fraction of human contribution increased steadily and accelerated to almost two...

antarctic ice sheet
2014-08-13 03:45:26

Kelly April Tyrrell, University of Wisconsin-Madison When the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently requested a figure for its annual report, to show global temperature trends over the last 10,000 years, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Zhengyu Liu knew that was going to be a problem. “We have been building models and there are now robust contradictions,” says Liu, a professor in the UW-Madison Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and the Center...

mollusk shell
2014-08-11 03:30:14

Hannah Hickey, University of Washington The planet’s largest and most powerful driver of climate changes from one year to the next, the El Niño Southern Oscillation in the tropical Pacific Ocean, was widely thought to have been weaker in ancient times because of a different configuration of the Earth’s orbit. But scientists analyzing 25-foot piles of ancient shells have found that the El Niños 10,000 years ago were as strong and frequent as the ones we experience today. The...

Researchers Find Cooling Effect In Warming Arctic lakes
2014-08-07 03:47:42

University of Minnesota Scientists have known for a while that warming global temperatures are causing Arctic lakes to release methane, a potent greenhouse gas that leads to even more warming. In a new study published in the journal Nature, a team of researchers including U of M researcher Jacques Finlay, found that Siberian lakes have actually pulled more greenhouse gasses from the atmosphere than they have released into it since the last Ice Age, causing an overall slight cooling...

pacific trade winds
2014-08-04 05:15:20

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Climate scientists have finally solved the mystery as to why the equatorial Pacific trade winds, which were expected to get weaker due to increasing greenhouse gas levels, have actually gotten stronger in recent years. For more than a decade, experts have wondered why the trade winds have behaved in contrast to climate models and become supercharged since the early 1990s. The phenomenon, according to a team of US and Australian...

2014-07-28 13:00:25

NCAR/UCAR The world faces a small but substantially increased risk over the next two decades of a major slowdown in the growth of global crop yields because of climate change, new research finds. The authors, from Stanford University and the National Center for Atmospheric Research, say the odds of a major production slowdown of wheat and corn, even with a warming climate, are not very high. But the risk is about 20 times more significant than it would be without global warming, and it...

Leaf-mining Insects Completely Disappeared With The Dinosaurs
2014-07-28 03:16:19

By A'ndrea Eluse Messer, Penn State After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs' extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared. Only a million years later, at Mexican Hat, in southeastern Montana, fossil leaves show diverse leaf-mining traces from new insects that were not present during the Cretaceous, according to paleontologists. "Our results indicate both that...

2014-07-28 10:19:39

Oregon State University Scientists have long been concerned that global warming may push Earth's climate system across a "tipping point," where rapid melting of ice and further warming may become irreversible -- a hotly debated scenario with an unclear picture of what this point of no return may look like. A newly published study by researchers at Oregon State University probed the geologic past to understand mechanisms of abrupt climate change. The study pinpoints the emergence of...


Latest Climate history Reference Libraries

Climate Change
2013-04-01 11:05:27

Climate change is a substantial and lasting change in the statistical distribution of weather patterns over periods of time ranging from decades to millions of years. It might be a change in the average weather conditions, or in the distribution of weather around the average conditions. Climate change is a result of factors that include oceanic processes, biotic processes, variations in solar radiation received buy Earth, volcanic eruptions, and plate tectonics, and human induced alterations...

Current Sea Level Rise
2013-04-01 10:39:21

The sea levels all around the world are rising. Current sea-level rise has the potential to affect human populations and the natural environment. Two key factors have contributed to the observed sea level rise. The first is thermal expansion: as the ocean water warms, it expands. The second is from the influence of land-based ice because of increased melting. The major store of water on land is found in the glaciers and the ice sheets. The rising of sea levels is one of several lines of...

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Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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