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Latest Clinical pathology Stories

2013-04-29 23:02:20

Her keynote address to set the stage for a global scientific conference in Chicago. Chicago (PRWEB) April 29, 2013 Hillary Rodham Clinton, former Secretary of State and former U.S. Senator from New York will be the keynote speaker at the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) 2013 Annual Meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in Chicago. Secretary Clinton served as the 67th Secretary of State of the United States from January 21, 2009 until February 1, 2013. Her...

2013-04-25 16:15:56

The microbial population in the air of the New York City subway system is nearly identical to that of ambient air on the city streets. This research, published ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology, establishes an important baseline, should it become necessary to monitor the subway's air for dispersal of potentially dangerous microbes. Also, the combination of new methodologies in the study, including fast collection of aerosols and rapid sequencing technology,...

Your Gut’s Microbiome Has A Unique Bacteria Profile
2013-04-24 07:27:18

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In the human body, microbial cells outnumber human cells ten to one. Your body has a set of microbial communities collectively known as a microbiome. Scientists studying the microbiome are learning about the relationship between these microbes and human health and disease. Dr. Nanette Steinle of the University of Maryland's School of Medicine and Dr. Emmanuel Mongodin of the University of Maryland Institute of Genome...

We Share More Of Our Germs With Dogs Than We Do With Our Children
2013-04-17 14:38:08

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers writing in the new online science and biomedical journal eLIFE say parents share more bacteria with family dogs than children. The team, led by the University of Colorado-Boulder, looked at the types and transfer modes of microbes from the guts, tongues, foreheads and palms of 60 American families and their canines. In all, they sampled 159 people and 36 dogs. Researchers swabbed various parts of the body to obtain...

2013-04-12 16:09:35

Newcastle University scientists have revealed the mechanism that causes a slime to form, making bacteria hard to shift and resistant to antibiotics. When under threat, some bacteria can shield themselves in a slimy protective layer, known as a biofilm. It is made up of communities of bacteria held together to protect themselves from attack. Biofilms cause dental plaque and sinusitis; in healthcare, biofilms can lead to life threatening and difficult to treat infections, particularly on...

Seabed Microbiology Turned Upside Down By Four Cells
2013-03-28 13:31:10

Aarhus University Single-celled archaea are invisible to the naked eye, and even when using a microscope, great care must be taken to observe them. An international team of researchers led by the Center for Geomicrobiology, Aarhus University, Denmark, has nevertheless succeeded in retrieving four archaeal cells from seabed mud and mapping the genome of each one. "Until now, nobody knew how these widespread mud-dwelling archaea actually live. Mapping the genome from the four archaeal...


Latest Clinical pathology Reference Libraries

0_acc42e71b0d88e5b1f3520ddbf139579
2011-04-28 14:45:47

Streptococcus salivarius is a species of spherical, Gram-positive bacteria which colonize the mouth and upper respiratory tract of humans a few hours after birth, making further exposure to the bacteria harmless. The bacterium is an opportunistic pathogen which rarely makes its way into the bloodstream where it is associated with septicemia cases in people with neutropenia. It has different characteristics when exposed to different environmental nutrients. In the lab a SYTA plate is used...

0_097d9a33e1035f1ca4b33243c5beaafa
2011-04-26 23:26:27

Streptococcus oralis is a Gram positive bacterium that grows characteristically in chains. On a Wilkins-Chalgren agar plate it will form slam white colonies. It is classified as a member of the streptococcus mitis group and is found in high numbers in the oral cavity. S. oralis produce neuraminidase and an IgA protease and cannot bind α-amylase.

0_4d46cc72a490344d44ba78359f528175
2011-04-26 21:07:20

Enterococcus is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium inhabiting the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. It is a main constituent of some probiotic food supplements. E. faecalis can cause life-threatening infections in humans, especially in the nosocomial environment, where the naturally high levels of antibiotic resistance found in E. faecalis contribute to its pathogenicity. It is frequently found in root canal-treated teeth in prevalence values ranging from 30% to 90% of...

0_565be8ac4669df235cfa9eb09fa14a3d
2011-04-26 20:59:00

Staphylococcus epidermidis is one of thirty-three known species belonging to the genus Staphylococcus. It is part of our skin flora and can also be found in the mucous membranes and in animals. It is the most common species found in laboratory test due to contamination. It is not usually pathogenic; however, patients with a compromised immune system often risk infection. Infections can be both nosocomial and community acquired and are more of a threat to hospital patients. Hospitals carry...

0_61d5902327f84255291bb79e2358eb65
2011-04-25 21:36:59

Serratia marcescens is a species of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. S. marcescens is involved in nosocomial infections particularly catheter-associated bacteremia. It is commonly found in respiratory and urinarty tracts of hospitalized adults and often in the gastrointestinal system of children. It is commonly found growing in bathrooms due to its preference for damp conditions. It manifests as a pink discoloration and a slimy film feeding off...

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Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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