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Latest Clinical pathology Stories

2012-04-10 12:48:04

Bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, the ℠superbug´ behind MRSA, can be a major problem for patients who have a medical implant, such as a replacement heart valve or pacemaker. Bacteria are able to form colonies -- called biofilms -- on the implanted device, which can lead to wider infections such as endocarditis, a bacterial infection of the heart. Research led by scientists in the Department of Biology at the University of York has shed new light on how these...

2012-04-05 14:04:49

New treatments that combat the growing problem of antibiotic resistance by disarming rather than killing bacteria may be on the horizon, according to a new study. Published in Nature Structure and Molecular Biology, research led by Monash University showed a protein complex called the Translocation and Assembly Module (TAM), formed a type of molecular pump in bacteria. The TAM allows bacteria to shuttle key disease-causing molecules from inside the bacterial cell where they are made, to...

2012-04-04 20:43:31

Drug dispensing robots designed to quickly prepare intravenous medications in a sterile environment can harbor dangerous bacteria, according to a report in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. During a routine screening in 2010, personnel at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in North Carolina discovered Bacillus cereus bacteria in samples dispensed by their machine, the Intellifill IV. "To our knowledge, this is...

2012-03-28 09:09:08

When faced with life-or-death situations, bacteria Рand maybe even human cells Рuse an extremely sophisticated version of "game theory" to consider their options and decide upon the best course of action, scientists reported here today. In a presentation at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, they said microbes "play" a version of the classic "Prisoner's Dilemma" game. Jos̩...

2012-03-27 23:55:09

Microorganisms can sometimes lose the ability to perform a function that appears to be necessary for their survival, and yet they still somehow manage to endure and multiply. How can this be? The authors of an opinion piece appearing in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, on March 27 explain their ideas about the matter. They say microbes that shed necessary functions are getting others to do the hard work for them, an adaptation that can...

2012-03-27 13:54:56

Cold-like infections make 'cough receptors' in the airways more sensitive, making asthmatics more prone to bouts of coughing and wheezing, reveal scientists presenting their findings at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Conference in Dublin. The work could lead to drugs that reduce virus-induced coughing in those suffering from chronic lung diseases. Asthmatics often report bouts of coughing, wheezing and breathlessness when they have a cold and there is no current medicine...

2012-03-26 14:21:17

The ripeness of fruit could determine how food-poisoning bacteria grow on them, according to scientists presenting their work at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Conference in Dublin this week. Their work could lead to new strategies to improve food safety, bringing many health and economic benefits. A wide range of fresh produce has been linked to outbreaks of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica including melons, jalapeño and serrano peppers, basil,...

2012-03-19 19:23:27

Food-borne diseases might soon have another warrior to contend with, thanks to a new molecule discovered by chemists at the University of Illinois. The new antibiotic, an analog of the widely used food preservative nisin, also has potential to be a boon to the dairy industry as a treatment for bovine mastitis. The antibiotic nisin occurs naturally in milk, a product of bacteria resident in the cow's udder. It helps keep milk from spoiling and kills a broad spectrum of bacteria that cause...


Latest Clinical pathology Reference Libraries

0_acc42e71b0d88e5b1f3520ddbf139579
2011-04-28 14:45:47

Streptococcus salivarius is a species of spherical, Gram-positive bacteria which colonize the mouth and upper respiratory tract of humans a few hours after birth, making further exposure to the bacteria harmless. The bacterium is an opportunistic pathogen which rarely makes its way into the bloodstream where it is associated with septicemia cases in people with neutropenia. It has different characteristics when exposed to different environmental nutrients. In the lab a SYTA plate is used...

0_097d9a33e1035f1ca4b33243c5beaafa
2011-04-26 23:26:27

Streptococcus oralis is a Gram positive bacterium that grows characteristically in chains. On a Wilkins-Chalgren agar plate it will form slam white colonies. It is classified as a member of the streptococcus mitis group and is found in high numbers in the oral cavity. S. oralis produce neuraminidase and an IgA protease and cannot bind α-amylase.

0_4d46cc72a490344d44ba78359f528175
2011-04-26 21:07:20

Enterococcus is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium inhabiting the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other mammals. It is a main constituent of some probiotic food supplements. E. faecalis can cause life-threatening infections in humans, especially in the nosocomial environment, where the naturally high levels of antibiotic resistance found in E. faecalis contribute to its pathogenicity. It is frequently found in root canal-treated teeth in prevalence values ranging from 30% to 90% of...

0_565be8ac4669df235cfa9eb09fa14a3d
2011-04-26 20:59:00

Staphylococcus epidermidis is one of thirty-three known species belonging to the genus Staphylococcus. It is part of our skin flora and can also be found in the mucous membranes and in animals. It is the most common species found in laboratory test due to contamination. It is not usually pathogenic; however, patients with a compromised immune system often risk infection. Infections can be both nosocomial and community acquired and are more of a threat to hospital patients. Hospitals carry...

0_61d5902327f84255291bb79e2358eb65
2011-04-25 21:36:59

Serratia marcescens is a species of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. S. marcescens is involved in nosocomial infections particularly catheter-associated bacteremia. It is commonly found in respiratory and urinarty tracts of hospitalized adults and often in the gastrointestinal system of children. It is commonly found growing in bathrooms due to its preference for damp conditions. It manifests as a pink discoloration and a slimy film feeding off...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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