Quantcast
Early Humans May Have Preyed On Elephant Ancestor

Early Humans May Have Preyed On Elephant Ancestor Gomphothere

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Gomphotheres, genetic relatives of the elephant, were thought to have roamed North America and became extinct long before humans reached the continent. But, according to a new study,...

Latest Clovis culture Stories

Study Questions Younger Dryas Event Comet Theories
2014-05-14 07:31:39

April Flowers for redOrbit.com – Your Universe Online Approximately 128,000 years ago, near the end of the last Ice Age, there was a brief episode of glacial conditions called the Younger Dryas event. The Younger Dryas, named for a flower that flourished during this time, lasted about 1,000 years. There has been quite a bit of controversy in the scientific community regarding what might have initiated the event—with a wide range of theories, including one that has the event caused by...

America's Short-Lived Clovis People Genetically Mapped For First Time
2014-02-13 07:42:26

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Clovis people lived in America around 13,000 years ago. They hunted mammoth, mastodons and giant bison with big spears. Though they were not the first humans in America, they did represent the first humans with a wide expansion on the North American continent. That is, until the culture mysteriously disappeared only a few hundred years after it emerged. Who the Clovis people were, and what present day humans they are related to...

Large Mammals Of Younger Dryas Wiped Out By Asteroid
2013-09-03 06:40:55

[ Watch the Video: Younger Dryas Impact Wiped Out Large Mammals ] Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists long fascinated with trying to understand a dramatic global climate shift have revealed new evidence that could explain a few things. A new study, funded by the National Science Foundation and to be published online in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) Early Edition, has found that a cataclysmic asteroid or comet impact in the...

Scientist Calls Clovis Comet Theory Bogus
2013-01-30 20:42:49

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Researchers are contradicting one hypothesis that comet explosions may have ended the 9,000-year-old Clovis culture. The Clovis comet hypothesis was first reported in 2007, claiming a comet initiated the Younger Dryas cold period nearly 13,000 years ago. This period, also known as the Big Freeze, was a brief period of cold climatic conditions and drought, causing the collapse of the North American ice sheets. According to the...

Oregon Artifacts Stir Up Debate On Earliest Americans
2012-07-15 05:36:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Artifacts found in Oregon have once again stirred up the debate surrounding the earliest Americans and how they came to live in the Western Hemisphere. A team of mostly American researchers led by Dennis L. Jenkins, a University of Oregon archeologist, recently described the finding of several small spearheads and hunting tools along with human feces in the Paisley Cave complex that dated back to around 13,000 years ago. Their report...

Hunters Arrived in North America Earlier Than Previously Thought
2011-10-21 05:11:28

A team of researchers, led by a Texas A&M archaeologist, has used a bone point fragment from an ancient mastodon rib to confirm that hunters roamed North America at least 800 years earlier than previously thought, the university said in a Thursday press release. By studying the tip of that fragment, which was found in a mastodon rib from a Washington-based archeological dig, Michael Waters, director of the Center for the Study of the First Americans in the Department of Anthropology at...

deca3c8d5cd65abd26ba9ecf236d0bed1
2011-03-25 06:10:00

Scientists have uncovered ancient stone tools and thousands of other artifacts dating back 15,500 years at an archaeological dig in Texas, suggesting that humans settled the continent 2,500 years earlier than previously believed. The site, located in the Buttermilk Creek complex near Austin, is now the oldest settlement ever found in North America, scientists reported Thursday. The findings could challenge conventional beliefs about who the first American inhabitants were, and when they...

48ab91664df82f7366fff4c412c877bd1
2011-03-05 11:12:13

Oregon, Smithsonian-led team uncovers numerous artifacts at late Pleistocene sites on the Channel IslandsEvidence for a diversified sea-based economy among North American inhabitants dating from 12,200 to 11,400 years ago is emerging from three sites on California's Channel Islands.Reporting in the March 4 issue of Science, a 15-member team led by University of Oregon and Smithsonian Institution scholars describes the discovery of scores of stemmed projectile points and crescents dating to...

9331de45293d7918dcec28895973e6c21
2011-03-04 19:05:39

Archaeologists have uncovered caches of tools and animal remains from about 12,000 years ago on islands off the coast of California. The discovery shows fine tool technology and a rich maritime economy existed there. The tools vary markedly from mainland cultures of the era such as the Clovis. The finds suggest that early humans may have used coastal routes, rather than a land route, to South America. A team studying California's Channel Islands has found that the islands show evidence both...

7ab72ea7d055c9b24c4ab1b3af7a0f4d1
2011-02-25 06:15:00

The oldest human remains ever discovered in sub-Arctic North America have been unearthed in a newly excavated archaeological site in Alaska, scientists said on Thursday. The skeletal remains appear to be those of a 3-year-old child buried some 11,500 years ago, and could provide rare insight into the burial practices of Ice Age peoples and the lives of early settlers who crossed from Asia to the New World, the scientists said. The remains were discovered in an ancient fire pit within an...


Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
Related